Skip directly to content

Music in Twelve Parts

  • 79324

Track Listing

News & Reviews

  • IndieWire has published its list of The 25 Best Movie Scores of the 21st Century, including five for which Nonesuch released the soundtrack: Philip Glass's score to Stephen Daldry's 2002 film The Hours; Clint Mansell's for Darren Aronofsky's 2006 film The Fountain, performed by Kronos Quartet and Mogwai; and three scores to Paul Thomas Anderson films—Jon Brion's for 2002's Punch-Drunk Love, and Jonny Greenwood's for 2007's There Will Be Blood and the just-released Phantom Thread. IndieWire says "the last 18 years have given us some of the most memorable music ever written for the movies."

  • Happy birthday in advance to composer Philip Glass, who turns 80 this coming Tuesday. Among the celebratory events around the world this concert season is a BBC Total Immersion Day, broadcast on BBC Radio 3 from the Barbican in London this Saturday. NPR Music is marking Glass's milestone birthday with personal reflections from artists who have collaborated with the composer, including Laurie Anderson and Nico Muhly.

Buy Now

  • About This Album

    Music in Twelve Parts, written by Philip Glass between 1971 and 1974, is a deliberate, encyclopedic compendium of some techniques of repetition the composer had been evolving since the mid 1960s. It holds an important place in Glass's repertory—not only from a historical vantage point (as the longest and most ambitious concert piece for the Philip Glass Ensemble) but from a purely aesthetic standard as well, because Music in Twelve Parts is both a massive theoretical exercise and a deeply engrossing work of art. This evening-length piece, presented here on three CDs, represents, according to Glass himself, the culmination of his Minimalist period. The New York Times calls it "monumental" and recommends this set as the best recorded version of Glass's landmark work.

    After the piece's 2009 West Coast premiere, some 35 years delayed, the San Jose Mercury News exclaimed that with Music in Twelve Parts, Glass's writing leads "toward a new euphoric breakthrough." The paper described it this way: "There is a Baroque intricacy at work, a micro-level of interlocking gears, as well as a larger, tranced-out story line: the landscape, the percolating groove, the spaciousness of the piece, which feels improvisational, related to pulsing, early '70s jams by, say, Miles Davis or even the Grateful Dead."

    "For a full-body immersion in the early compositional world of Philip Glass, you can't do much better than Music in Twelve Parts," says the San Francisco Chronicle. The issues the composer addresses in the piece "are endlessly productive and nuanced. And to hear a composer lay out his palette in such richly evocative detail is a rare and rewarding delight."

    Credits

    MUSICIANS
    The Philip Glass Ensemble
    Michael Reisman, musical director, keyboards
    Lisa Bielawa, voice
    Jon Gibson, soprano saxophone, flute
    Philip Glass, Martin Goldray, keyboards
    Richard Peck, alto saxophone, tenor saxophone
    Andrew Sterman, flute, soprano saxophone

    PRODUCTION CREDITS
    Produced by Kurt Munkacsi and Michael Reisman
    Recorded March-June 1993 at The Looking Glass Studios, NYC
    Engineers: James Law, Dante DeSole
    Assistant Engineer: Skoti Elliott
    Mixed by Michael Reisman at The Looking Glass Studios

    Design John Gall
    Cover photograph by Robert Mapplethorpe

More From

nonesuch's picture
on May 29, 2008 - 7:14pm
Artist Name: 
Philip Glass
genre: 
Release Date: 
Friday, September 13, 1996 - 04:00
DescriptionExcerpt: 

This evening-length piece, presented here on three CDs, was written between 1971 and 1974 and represents, according to Glass himself, the culmination of his Minimalist period. The New York Times calls it "monumental" and recommends this set as the best recorded version of Glass's landmark work.

Description: 

Music in Twelve Parts, written by Philip Glass between 1971 and 1974, is a deliberate, encyclopedic compendium of some techniques of repetition the composer had been evolving since the mid 1960s. It holds an important place in Glass's repertory—not only from a historical vantage point (as the longest and most ambitious concert piece for the Philip Glass Ensemble) but from a purely aesthetic standard as well, because Music in Twelve Parts is both a massive theoretical exercise and a deeply engrossing work of art. This evening-length piece, presented here on three CDs, represents, according to Glass himself, the culmination of his Minimalist period. The New York Times calls it "monumental" and recommends this set as the best recorded version of Glass's landmark work.

After the piece's 2009 West Coast premiere, some 35 years delayed, the San Jose Mercury News exclaimed that with Music in Twelve Parts, Glass's writing leads "toward a new euphoric breakthrough." The paper described it this way: "There is a Baroque intricacy at work, a micro-level of interlocking gears, as well as a larger, tranced-out story line: the landscape, the percolating groove, the spaciousness of the piece, which feels improvisational, related to pulsing, early '70s jams by, say, Miles Davis or even the Grateful Dead."

"For a full-body immersion in the early compositional world of Philip Glass, you can't do much better than Music in Twelve Parts," says the San Francisco Chronicle. The issues the composer addresses in the piece "are endlessly productive and nuanced. And to hear a composer lay out his palette in such richly evocative detail is a rare and rewarding delight."

ProductionCredits: 

PRODUCTION CREDITS
Produced by Kurt Munkacsi and Michael Reisman
Recorded March-June 1993 at The Looking Glass Studios, NYC
Engineers: James Law, Dante DeSole
Assistant Engineer: Skoti Elliott
Mixed by Michael Reisman at The Looking Glass Studios

Design John Gall
Cover photograph by Robert Mapplethorpe

Cover Art: 
Nonesuch Selection Number: 

79324

Number of Discs in Set: 
3discs
ns_album_artistid: 
47
ns_album_id: 
127
ns_album_releasedate: 
Sunday, September 1, 1996 - 04:00
ns_genre_1: 
0
ns_genre_2: 
0
Album Status: 
UPC/Price: 
Label: 
MP3
UPC: 
603497125869
Price: 
0.00
Label: 
CD
UPC: 
075597932423
Price: 
0.00
MusicianDetails: 

MUSICIANS
The Philip Glass Ensemble
Michael Reisman, musical director, keyboards
Lisa Bielawa, voice
Jon Gibson, soprano saxophone, flute
Philip Glass, Martin Goldray, keyboards
Richard Peck, alto saxophone, tenor saxophone
Andrew Sterman, flute, soprano saxophone

[{"parent":{"title":"Get on the list !","body":" Get exclusive information about NONESUCH tour dates, video premieres and special announcements ","field_newsletter_id":"14075483","field_label_list_id":"6389157","field_display_rates":"-1","field_preview_mode":"false","field_lbox_height":"","field_lbox_width":"","field_toaster_timeout":"16000","field_toaster_position":"From Bottom","field_turnkey_height":"800"}}]

Performs On