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Sings Rodgers & Hart

  • 79406

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  • Polish composer Henryk Górecki's Symphony No. 3, Symphony of Sorrowful Songs, was released on Nonesuch Records 25 years ago today, April 24, 1992. Górecki had composed the piece in 1976, but it didn't appear on disc until then. The recording of the emotionally affecting piece, featuring soprano Dawn Upshaw and the London Sinfonietta led by conductor David Zinman, proved spellbinding to a diverse international audience, becoming the highest-selling album ever by a contemporary composer. "Perhaps people find something they need in this piece of music," Górecki speculated. "Somehow I hit the right note, something they were missing."

  • The Brooklyn Academy of Music's wide-ranging series of concerts and events Nonesuch Records at BAM: Celebrating a Label Without Labels, celebrating the 50th anniversary of Nonesuch Records, kicks off Tuesday night with the first of three consecutive nights of concerts from Philip Glass and Steve Reich plus a separate solo set from Brad Mehldau and continues through September 28. The New York Times says the series "reflects the broad curiosity and high standard of a label that has had notable successes ... with no guiding criteria other than instinct and taste." In conjunction with these events, BAMcinématek presents Nonesuch Records on Film, a salute to the label’s rich catalogue of movie soundtracks.

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  • About This Album

    Dawn Upshaw returns to the world of music theater for her sixth solo Nonesuch release, a highly personal selection from the Rodgers & Hart songbook. Fifteen tunes—from the duo’s first hit “Manhattan” to their last great ballad “Nobody’s Heart”—trace the rich development of the songwriting team that redefined the Broadway song from the 1920s until the 1940s.

    Featuring a varied set of arrangements, the collection joins Upshaw with a team of new and familiar Nonesuch collaborators, including conductor Eric Stern; the Orchestra of St. Luke’s; pianist Fred Hersch; soprano Audra McDonald; and baritone David Garrison. The recording is produced by Tommy Krasker.

    “Few opera singers have ever seemed so convincing—and comfortable—in the Broadway idiom” wrote TIME magazine in what was to be the first of many accolades for Upshaw’s first music theater collection, I Wish It So. The disc went on to win the 1995 Gramophone Award in Music Theatre as well as Best of the Year distinctions from The Guardian, The Sunday Telegraph, and The Independent on Sunday, among others.

    Simultaneously, Upshaw’s opera and recital recordings and international appearances place her among today’s most sought-after sopranos. With Dawn Upshaw Sings Rodgers & Hart, this most American of singers reaffirms her love for and identification with the Golden Age of musical theater, one of many stages that she occupies. In the words of Diapason, “Dawn Upshaw is the voice of the century, on the most bewitching path.”

    ABOUT RODGERS AND HART

    New Yorkers from opposite sides of the tracks, Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart met in 1919. Rodgers, at 16 just entering Columbia University, and Hart, at 24 just establishing his career, first collaborated on several university productions and fledgling Broadway ventures before their first success in 1925, Garrick Gaieties. Featuring the song “Manhattan,” it served as the springboard for their songwriting partnership, and was followed by A Connecticut Yankee (1927), On Your Toes (1936), Babes in Arms (1937), The Boys from Syracuse (1938); and Pal Joey (1940). The team continued through 1943, when Hart died at the age of 47.

    Together Rodgers, who was to go on to Oklahoma and South Pacific, and Hart, “the Laureate of Lyrics,” elevated the level of Broadway song from lightweight entertainment to witty, often poignant, commentaries. They avoided the obvious rhyme or cadence, preferring instead something memorable. “Everything you fellows write is clever,” once complained the legendary impresario Florenz Ziegfeld, wanting just a simple hit.

    Rodgers and Hart scored enough of these, however, including such standards as “I Could Write a Book” and “It Never Entered My Mind” and show-stoppers like “Thou Swell” and “Mountain Greenery.” Upshaw also re-introduces several little-known songs on this collection, like the ballad “He Was Too Good To Me”; the original Hugh Martin arrangement of “Sing For Your Supper”, in which Upshaw takes all three parts; the delightfully naughty “Twinkle in Your Eye”; “Ev’ry Sunday Afternoon”, a rarely recorded song about tryst-planning among domestic staff; and “You’re Nearer,” which was introduced by Lucille Ball in the film Too Many Girls.

    Credits

    MUSICIANS
    Dawn Upshaw, vocals
    Eric Stern, conductor
    Fred Hersch, piano (2, 9, 10, 12, 15)
    David Garrison, vocals (6)
    Audra McDonald, vocals (10)
    Drew Gress, bass (10)
    Matt Wilson, drums (10)

    Orchestra of St. Luke’s (3):
    Violin: Suzanne Ornstein, concertmaster; Alicia Edelberg, Martin Agee, Joyce Hammann, Mitchell Stern, Katherine Livolsi, Eric DeGioia, Xin Zhao
    Viola: Ron Carbone, Lois Martin, David Cerutti, Mitsue Takayama
    Cello: Clay Ruede, David Calhoun
    Bass: John Beal
    Woodwind: Elizabeth Mann, Les Scott, Rick Heckman, Chuck Wilson, Robert Ingliss, John Moses
    Horn: Ronald Sell, contractor; Russell Rizner
    Trumpet: Robert Millikan, Tony Kadleck
    Trombone: James Pugh
    Drums: John Redsecker
    Percussion: Eric Charleston
    Piano: Leslie Stifelman
    Harp: Jennifer Hoult

    PRODUCTION CREDITS
    Produced by Tommy Krasker
    Recorded June 1995 at the Hit Factory, New York City
    Recorded and mixed by Joel Moss
    Assistant Engineers: Carl Glanville and Drake Ayen
    Edited by Paul Zinman, SoundByte Productions, New York City
    Mixed at Signet Sound Studios, Los Angeles, CA
    Assistant Engineer: Rich Weingart
    Mastered by Ric Wilson, Digisonics, Tarzana, CA

    Music by Richard Rodgers; lyrics by Lorenz Hart. Track 1, 3 arr. Eric Stern, orch. Russell Warner; track 4 vocal arr. Hugh Martin and Ralph Blane, orch. Larry Wilcox; track 5 orch. Eric Stern; track 6 orch. Don Walker, restored by Larry Moore; tracks 7, 8 orch. Russell Warner; track 10 arr. Fred Hersch; track 11 orch. Hans Spialek; track 14 orch. Russell Warner

    Design by Henrietta Condak
    Illustrations by Sara

    Executive Producer: Robert Hurwitz

nonesuch's picture
on May 29, 2008 - 7:14pm
Artist Name: 
Dawn Upshaw
Release Date: 
Friday, October 11, 1996 - 04:00
DescriptionExcerpt: 

Upshaw explores the legacy of Broadway's storied composer team; guests include Audra McDonald and Fred Hersch. The Independent (UK) says “it's invariably charming and stylish, and when she sings about turning Manhattan into 'an isle of joy' it's surprisingly touching.”

Description: 

Dawn Upshaw returns to the world of music theater for her sixth solo Nonesuch release, a highly personal selection from the Rodgers & Hart songbook. Fifteen tunes—from the duo’s first hit “Manhattan” to their last great ballad “Nobody’s Heart”—trace the rich development of the songwriting team that redefined the Broadway song from the 1920s until the 1940s.

Featuring a varied set of arrangements, the collection joins Upshaw with a team of new and familiar Nonesuch collaborators, including conductor Eric Stern; the Orchestra of St. Luke’s; pianist Fred Hersch; soprano Audra McDonald; and baritone David Garrison. The recording is produced by Tommy Krasker.

“Few opera singers have ever seemed so convincing—and comfortable—in the Broadway idiom” wrote TIME magazine in what was to be the first of many accolades for Upshaw’s first music theater collection, I Wish It So. The disc went on to win the 1995 Gramophone Award in Music Theatre as well as Best of the Year distinctions from The Guardian, The Sunday Telegraph, and The Independent on Sunday, among others.

Simultaneously, Upshaw’s opera and recital recordings and international appearances place her among today’s most sought-after sopranos. With Dawn Upshaw Sings Rodgers & Hart, this most American of singers reaffirms her love for and identification with the Golden Age of musical theater, one of many stages that she occupies. In the words of Diapason, “Dawn Upshaw is the voice of the century, on the most bewitching path.”

ABOUT RODGERS AND HART

New Yorkers from opposite sides of the tracks, Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart met in 1919. Rodgers, at 16 just entering Columbia University, and Hart, at 24 just establishing his career, first collaborated on several university productions and fledgling Broadway ventures before their first success in 1925, Garrick Gaieties. Featuring the song “Manhattan,” it served as the springboard for their songwriting partnership, and was followed by A Connecticut Yankee (1927), On Your Toes (1936), Babes in Arms (1937), The Boys from Syracuse (1938); and Pal Joey (1940). The team continued through 1943, when Hart died at the age of 47.

Together Rodgers, who was to go on to Oklahoma and South Pacific, and Hart, “the Laureate of Lyrics,” elevated the level of Broadway song from lightweight entertainment to witty, often poignant, commentaries. They avoided the obvious rhyme or cadence, preferring instead something memorable. “Everything you fellows write is clever,” once complained the legendary impresario Florenz Ziegfeld, wanting just a simple hit.

Rodgers and Hart scored enough of these, however, including such standards as “I Could Write a Book” and “It Never Entered My Mind” and show-stoppers like “Thou Swell” and “Mountain Greenery.” Upshaw also re-introduces several little-known songs on this collection, like the ballad “He Was Too Good To Me”; the original Hugh Martin arrangement of “Sing For Your Supper”, in which Upshaw takes all three parts; the delightfully naughty “Twinkle in Your Eye”; “Ev’ry Sunday Afternoon”, a rarely recorded song about tryst-planning among domestic staff; and “You’re Nearer,” which was introduced by Lucille Ball in the film Too Many Girls.

ProductionCredits: 

PRODUCTION CREDITS
Produced by Tommy Krasker
Recorded June 1995 at the Hit Factory, New York City
Recorded and mixed by Joel Moss
Assistant Engineers: Carl Glanville and Drake Ayen
Edited by Paul Zinman, SoundByte Productions, New York City
Mixed at Signet Sound Studios, Los Angeles, CA
Assistant Engineer: Rich Weingart
Mastered by Ric Wilson, Digisonics, Tarzana, CA

Music by Richard Rodgers; lyrics by Lorenz Hart. Track 1, 3 arr. Eric Stern, orch. Russell Warner; track 4 vocal arr. Hugh Martin and Ralph Blane, orch. Larry Wilcox; track 5 orch. Eric Stern; track 6 orch. Don Walker, restored by Larry Moore; tracks 7, 8 orch. Russell Warner; track 10 arr. Fred Hersch; track 11 orch. Hans Spialek; track 14 orch. Russell Warner

Design by Henrietta Condak
Illustrations by Sara

Executive Producer: Robert Hurwitz

Cover Art: 
Nonesuch Selection Number: 

79406

Number of Discs in Set: 
1disc
ns_album_artistid: 
115
ns_album_id: 
304
ns_album_releasedate: 
Tuesday, October 1, 1996 - 04:00
ns_genre_1: 
0
ns_genre_2: 
0
Album Status: 
UPC/Price: 
Label: 
CD+MP3
UPC: 
075597940626BUN
Price: 
0.00
Label: 
MP3
UPC: 
603497076468
Price: 
10.00
MusicianDetails: 

MUSICIANS
Dawn Upshaw, vocals
Eric Stern, conductor
Fred Hersch, piano (2, 9, 10, 12, 15)
David Garrison, vocals (6)
Audra McDonald, vocals (10)
Drew Gress, bass (10)
Matt Wilson, drums (10)

Orchestra of St. Luke’s (3):
Violin: Suzanne Ornstein, concertmaster; Alicia Edelberg, Martin Agee, Joyce Hammann, Mitchell Stern, Katherine Livolsi, Eric DeGioia, Xin Zhao
Viola: Ron Carbone, Lois Martin, David Cerutti, Mitsue Takayama
Cello: Clay Ruede, David Calhoun
Bass: John Beal
Woodwind: Elizabeth Mann, Les Scott, Rick Heckman, Chuck Wilson, Robert Ingliss, John Moses
Horn: Ronald Sell, contractor; Russell Rizner
Trumpet: Robert Millikan, Tony Kadleck
Trombone: James Pugh
Drums: John Redsecker
Percussion: Eric Charleston
Piano: Leslie Stifelman
Harp: Jennifer Hoult

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