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Carnegie Hall 2014–15 Season to Include Jeremy Denk, Richard Goode, Gidon Kremer, Kronos Quartet, Audra McDonald

Carnegie Hall 2014-15 Season

Carnegie Hall has announced its 2014–15 concert season, and featured among the performers taking the esteemed hall's stages are a number of artists familiar to readers of the Nonesuch Journal, including Jeremy Denk, Richard Goode, Gidon Kremer, Kronos Quartet, and Audra McDonald, as well as an all–Steve Reich program and the New York premiere of a work by Jonny Greenwood.

Pianist Jeremy Denk opens Carnegie Hall's Chamber Sessions III series in Zankel Hall on December 4, 2014, with the New York premiere of The Classical Style, the comic opera for which he wrote the libretto, with music by Steven Stucky, performed by The Knights. The piece, co-commissioned by Carnegie Hall, will receive its world premiere at the Ojai Music Festival, of which Denk is music director, this June.

Later that month, Audra McDonald returns to Carnegie Hall's Stern Auditorium for a performance on December 12, joined by her musical director, Andy Einhorn, who also led the musicians on her latest album, Go Back Home, released last year on Nonesuch. The concert closes out series aptly titled The Originals.

Also performing in the Chamber Sessions III series is pianist Richard Goode, who, in fact, is participating in four different concerts at Carnegie Hall in the upcoming season. His first 2014–15 event, Richard Goode and Friends, takes place February 22, 2015, in Zankel Hall, for which Goode will be joined by soprano Sarah Shafer, violinist Itamar Zorman, violist Kyle Armbrust, and cellist Brook Speltz on a program of works by Schumann and Brahms.

A second Richard Goode and Friends will take place March 26 in Zankel Hall with fellow pianist Ieva Jokubaviciute and the aforementioned string quartet performing works by Debussy, Fauré, and Ravel, as part of the Chamber Sessions II series.

Goode performs two concerts in Stern Auditorium in April 2015: a concert with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, led by Andris Nelsons, on April 15, featuring Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 27 in B-flat Major, K. 595, Strauss's Ein Heldenleben, and the New York premiere of Gunther Schuller's Dreamscape, as part of the Concertos Plus series; and a solo recital of works by Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms, Debussy, and Schumann on April 24, in the Keyboard Virtuosos II series.

Earlier in 2015, Gidon Kremer is joined by pianist Daniil Trifonov for a performance of works by Mozart, Weinberg, Schubert, and Philip Glass in Stern Auditorium, on January 23, for the Great Artists II series.

Back in Zankel Hall, Kronos Quartet gives two New York premieres—a new work by Derek Charke, co-commissioned by Carnegie Hall, and Aleksandra Vrebalov's Beyond Zero: 1914–1918, with a film by Bill Morrison—on March 7, 2015, as part of the Signatures series.

Additionally, Carnegie Hall concertgoers can partake of an all–Steve Reich program during the month of the composer's 78th birthday with the October 29 concert in Zankel Hall by percussionists Colin Currie and Daniel Druckman, pianists Simon Crawford-Phillips and Philip Moore, and students from The Juilliard School, opening the Fast Forward series. On the program are two famed Reich works, Clapping Music (1972) and Drumming (1970–71), and the US premiere of Quartet, co-commissioned by Carnegie Hall.

Another premiere comes later in the season in the Australian Chamber Orchestra's April 26, 2015, concert in Zankel Hall featuring the first New York performance of Jonny Greenwood's Water, along with works by Prokofiev, Mozart, and Haydn, as part of the Chamber Sessions I series.

New York Pops subscribers will also enjoy a special holiday treat as Kelli O'Hara and Matthew Morrison, the stars of composer Adam Guettel's 2005 Tony Award–winning musical The Light in the Piazza, are guest artists for a night of festive tunes on December 19, 2014.

For more information on these and other performances in Carnegie Hall's 2014–2015 season, visit carnegiehall.org.

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