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Gidon Kremer's "De Profundis" Out Now; Boston Globe Calls Kremer "One of the Most Important Violinists Before the Public Today"

  • Tuesday, September 14, 2010
    Gidon Kremer's "De Profundis" Out Now; Boston Globe Calls Kremer "One of the Most Important Violinists Before the Public Today"

    Today marks the release of De Profundis, the latest album from violinist Gidon Kremer, whom the Boston Globe recently called "one of the most important violinists before the public today," and his Kremerata Baltica chamber orchestra. The album features 12 pieces from Kremer's performing repertoire; the composers represented span nearly two centuries, from Schubert to Schnittke—artists who sought to "sustain humans by appealing to their profoundest emotions," says Kremer, "by letting them open up, become more conscious, rather than 'forget themselves.'"

    Kremer is the subject of a feature article in the Boston Globe, leading the paper's Fall Arts Preview of Classical Music. He and the Kremerata Baltica will perform pieces from the new album at Boston's Jordan Hall as part of their fall tour of the United States. (For dates, venues, and ticket information, visit nonesuch.com/on-tour.)

    In the article, Globe staff writer Jeremy Eichler looks at Kremer's unconventional career, from his earliest days as a "rebel genius," in which he has mixed classical and contemporary works into his repertoire, as on De Profundis. Eichler writes of "a powerful independent streak and a questing musical spirit that, coupled with a superb technique and a gift for highly personal and spontaneous interpretations, has made him one of the most important violinists before the public today. Over the years, even as his fame grew, Kremer, now 63, has retained a refreshingly unconventional musical perspective."

    You can read the complete article at boston.com. To pick up a copy of De Profundis, with audiophile-quality, 320 kbps MP3s of the complete album included at checkout, head to the Nonesuch Store.

    Also in the Globe's Fall Preview, in a video feature, Eichler explains why "Kremer is one of the violin players I've followed with great fascination for many years now." You can watch it here:

on September 14, 2010 - 1:31pm
Excerpt: 

Today marks the release of De Profundis, the latest album from violinist Gidon Kremer, whom the Boston Globe calls "one of the most important violinists before the public today," and his Kremerata Baltica chamber orchestra. Kremer is featured in the Globe's Fall Arts Preview of Classical Music, which looks at his unconventional career, from "rebel genius" to an artist who "has retained a refreshingly unconventional musical perspective."

Copy: 

Today marks the release of De Profundis, the latest album from violinist Gidon Kremer, whom the Boston Globe recently called "one of the most important violinists before the public today," and his Kremerata Baltica chamber orchestra. The album features 12 pieces from Kremer's performing repertoire; the composers represented span nearly two centuries, from Schubert to Schnittke—artists who sought to "sustain humans by appealing to their profoundest emotions," says Kremer, "by letting them open up, become more conscious, rather than 'forget themselves.'"

Kremer is the subject of a feature article in the Boston Globe, leading the paper's Fall Arts Preview of Classical Music. He and the Kremerata Baltica will perform pieces from the new album at Boston's Jordan Hall as part of their fall tour of the United States. (For dates, venues, and ticket information, visit nonesuch.com/on-tour.)

In the article, Globe staff writer Jeremy Eichler looks at Kremer's unconventional career, from his earliest days as a "rebel genius," in which he has mixed classical and contemporary works into his repertoire, as on De Profundis. Eichler writes of "a powerful independent streak and a questing musical spirit that, coupled with a superb technique and a gift for highly personal and spontaneous interpretations, has made him one of the most important violinists before the public today. Over the years, even as his fame grew, Kremer, now 63, has retained a refreshingly unconventional musical perspective."

You can read the complete article at boston.com. To pick up a copy of De Profundis, with audiophile-quality, 320 kbps MP3s of the complete album included at checkout, head to the Nonesuch Store.

Also in the Globe's Fall Preview, in a video feature, Eichler explains why "Kremer is one of the violin players I've followed with great fascination for many years now." You can watch it here:

Publish date: 
Tuesday, September 14, 2010 - 12:00
Article Type: 
featuredimage: 
Gidon Kremer: "De Profundis" [cover]

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