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New Yorker: Richard Goode Offers "Truly Revelatory Playing" on Complete Beethoven Concertos

  • Tuesday, September 8, 2009
    New Yorker: Richard Goode Offers "Truly Revelatory Playing" on Complete Beethoven Concertos

    Richard Goode's recording of Beethoven's Complete Piano Concertos with Iván Fischer and the Budapest Festival Orchestra was released on Nonesuch Records earlier this year. In last week's issue of The New Yorker, reviewer Russell Platt describes the orchestra and its conductor as "sterling collaborators" on the three-disc set, for creating "a supple, measured lyricism that avoids self-indulgent extremes, an equipoise that the veteran Goode, as a successor to Rudolf Serkin, has developed entirely on his own."

    The pianist's rich history of recording works by Beethoven goes back decades, including, famously, the 1993 Nonesuch release of the complete Beethoven sonatas. Platt goes on to say of his latest effort:

    No one will be surprised by the humane and poetic qualities the pianist brings to the meditative Fourth Concerto, but in the concluding “Emperor” Concerto Goode offers truly revelatory playing, turning that shameless virtuoso showcase into a vibrant, three-dimensional creation.

    Read the complete review at newyorker.com.

    Journal Articles:Reviews
on September 8, 2009 - 1:58pm
Excerpt: 

Richard Goode's Nonesuch recording of Beethoven's Complete Piano Concertos with Iván Fischer and the Budapest Festival Orchestra is out now. The New Yorker cites the "supple, measured lyricism" from Goode and his "sterling collaborators" on the album, finding both "the humane and poetic qualities" one has come to expect from the pianist and "truly revelatory playing" as well.

Copy: 

Richard Goode's recording of Beethoven's Complete Piano Concertos with Iván Fischer and the Budapest Festival Orchestra was released on Nonesuch Records earlier this year. In last week's issue of The New Yorker, reviewer Russell Platt describes the orchestra and its conductor as "sterling collaborators" on the three-disc set, for creating "a supple, measured lyricism that avoids self-indulgent extremes, an equipoise that the veteran Goode, as a successor to Rudolf Serkin, has developed entirely on his own."

The pianist's rich history of recording works by Beethoven goes back decades, including, famously, the 1993 Nonesuch release of the complete Beethoven sonatas. Platt goes on to say of his latest effort:

No one will be surprised by the humane and poetic qualities the pianist brings to the meditative Fourth Concerto, but in the concluding “Emperor” Concerto Goode offers truly revelatory playing, turning that shameless virtuoso showcase into a vibrant, three-dimensional creation.

Read the complete review at newyorker.com.

Publish date: 
Tuesday, September 8, 2009 - 11:00
Article Type: 
featuredimage: 
Richard Goode "Complete Beethoven Piano Concertos" [cover]

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