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NY Times: Steve Reich Gives "Supple Account" of His Revolutionary Work

  • Thursday, March 5, 2009
    NY Times: Steve Reich Gives "Supple Account" of His Revolutionary Work

    Steve Reich - color

    Steve Reich & Musicians' performance of the composer's groundbreaking 1976 piece Music for 18 Musicians capped off a marathon concert at Lincoln Center's newly renovated Alice Tully Hall on Tuesday night. The evening's program, titled New York, New Music, New Hall, was part of the Hall's Opening Nights Festival of events celebrating the redesigned space. Starting the concert off was Alarm Will Sound, led by artistic director Alan Pierson, followed by Bang on a Can All-Stars, featuring special guest Glenn Kotche.

    The New York Times's Allan Kozinn says in this "celebration of what was once called downtown music," Kotche's 2007 work Mobile, which the drummer performed with Bang on a Can, was a "bright-edged, vigorously syncopated" piece.

    Kozinn says Reich and his ensemble gave "a supple account" of the seminal Reich piece, which the reviewer calls "a pivotal work in Mr. Reich’s canon and a score that helps define the boundary between Minimalism and post-Minimalism." He continues:

    Its Minimalist DNA—the insistent ostinato that runs through the hourlong score, and note-by-note evolution of the superimposed themes—grabs the attention. But the density and variety of those themes are the work’s real meat, and they were a revolution for Mr. Reich.

    Read the complete concert review at nytimes.com.

on March 5, 2009 - 11:11am
Excerpt: 

Steve Reich & Musicians' performance capped off a marathon concert at Lincoln Center's newly renovated Alice Tully Hall Tuesday night for the Hall's Opening Nights Festival. Starting the concert off was Alarm Will Sound, followed by Bang on a Can All-Stars with Glenn Kotche, whose Mobile the New York Times describes as a "bright-edged, vigorously syncopated" piece. The Times says Reich and his ensemble gave "a supple account" of the composer's Music for 18 Musicians, "a pivotal work in Mr. Reich’s canon and a score that helps define the boundary between Minimalism and post-Minimalism."

Copy: 

Steve Reich & Musicians' performance of the composer's groundbreaking 1976 piece Music for 18 Musicians capped off a marathon concert at Lincoln Center's newly renovated Alice Tully Hall on Tuesday night. The evening's program, titled New York, New Music, New Hall, was part of the Hall's Opening Nights Festival of events celebrating the redesigned space. Starting the concert off was Alarm Will Sound, led by artistic director Alan Pierson, followed by Bang on a Can All-Stars, featuring special guest Glenn Kotche.

The New York Times's Allan Kozinn says in this "celebration of what was once called downtown music," Kotche's 2007 work Mobile, which the drummer performed with Bang on a Can, was a "bright-edged, vigorously syncopated" piece.

Kozinn says Reich and his ensemble gave "a supple account" of the seminal Reich piece, which the reviewer calls "a pivotal work in Mr. Reich’s canon and a score that helps define the boundary between Minimalism and post-Minimalism." He continues:

Its Minimalist DNA—the insistent ostinato that runs through the hourlong score, and note-by-note evolution of the superimposed themes—grabs the attention. But the density and variety of those themes are the work’s real meat, and they were a revolution for Mr. Reich.

Read the complete concert review at nytimes.com.

Publish date: 
Thursday, March 5, 2009 - 10:30
Article Type: 
featuredimage: 
Steve Reich - color

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