Skip directly to content
Browse by:
  • Thursday, March 5, 2009
    NY Times: Steve Reich Gives "Supple Account" of His Revolutionary Work
    Wonge Bergmann

    Steve Reich & Musicians' performance of the composer's groundbreaking 1976 piece Music for 18 Musicians capped off a marathon concert at Lincoln Center's newly renovated Alice Tully Hall on Tuesday night. The evening's program, titled New York, New Music, New Hall, was part of the Hall's Opening Nights Festival of events celebrating the redesigned space. Starting the concert off was Alarm Will Sound, led by artistic director Alan Pierson, followed by Bang on a Can All-Stars, featuring special guest Glenn Kotche.

    The New York Times's Allan Kozinn says in this "celebration of what was once called downtown music," Kotche's 2007 work Mobile, which the drummer performed with Bang on a Can, was a "bright-edged, vigorously syncopated" piece.

    Kozinn says Reich and his ensemble gave "a supple account" of the seminal Reich piece, which the reviewer calls "a pivotal work in Mr. Reich’s canon and a score that helps define the boundary between Minimalism and post-Minimalism." He continues:

    Its Minimalist DNA—the insistent ostinato that runs through the hourlong score, and note-by-note evolution of the superimposed themes—grabs the attention. But the density and variety of those themes are the work’s real meat, and they were a revolution for Mr. Reich.

    Read the complete concert review at nytimes.com.

    Journal Articles:Reviews

Enjoy This Post?

Share This Post

NY Times: Steve Reich Gives "Supple Account" of His Revolutionary Work

Browse by:
nonesuch's picture
on March 5, 2009 - 11:11am
Article Type: 
Publish date: 
Thursday, March 5, 2009 - 15:30
Excerpt: 

Steve Reich & Musicians' performance capped off a marathon concert at Lincoln Center's newly renovated Alice Tully Hall Tuesday night for the Hall's Opening Nights Festival. Starting the concert off was Alarm Will Sound, followed by Bang on a Can All-Stars with Glenn Kotche, whose Mobile the New York Times describes as a "bright-edged, vigorously syncopated" piece. The Times says Reich and his ensemble gave "a supple account" of the composer's Music for 18 Musicians, "a pivotal work in Mr. Reich’s canon and a score that helps define the boundary between Minimalism and post-Minimalism."

Copy: 

Steve Reich & Musicians' performance of the composer's groundbreaking 1976 piece Music for 18 Musicians capped off a marathon concert at Lincoln Center's newly renovated Alice Tully Hall on Tuesday night. The evening's program, titled New York, New Music, New Hall, was part of the Hall's Opening Nights Festival of events celebrating the redesigned space. Starting the concert off was Alarm Will Sound, led by artistic director Alan Pierson, followed by Bang on a Can All-Stars, featuring special guest Glenn Kotche.

The New York Times's Allan Kozinn says in this "celebration of what was once called downtown music," Kotche's 2007 work Mobile, which the drummer performed with Bang on a Can, was a "bright-edged, vigorously syncopated" piece.

Kozinn says Reich and his ensemble gave "a supple account" of the seminal Reich piece, which the reviewer calls "a pivotal work in Mr. Reich’s canon and a score that helps define the boundary between Minimalism and post-Minimalism." He continues:

Its Minimalist DNA—the insistent ostinato that runs through the hourlong score, and note-by-note evolution of the superimposed themes—grabs the attention. But the density and variety of those themes are the work’s real meat, and they were a revolution for Mr. Reich.

Read the complete concert review at nytimes.com.

featuredimage: 
Steve Reich - color

Submit Your Comment

Related Posts

  • Thursday, June 21, 2018
    Thursday, June 21, 2018

    David Byrne's American Utopia tour made its way to the UK for a week of sold-out shows, all met with rave reviews, starting with the NME's declaration: "The American Utopia tour may just be the best live show of all time." "An unforgettably unique, imaginative, and kaleidoscopically entrancing spectacle of music, dance, and theatre," exclaims the Telegraph. "This was something special." "One of the most mind-blowingly meticulous and awe-inspiring productions you could ever hope to see," says the Independent. "Perfection." "Daringly ambitious and full of joy," says the Evening Standard. "Mass exposure to his glorious, life-affirming American Utopia show alone would make the world a better place," says the Scotsman. "An extraordinary, ecstatic show."

    Journal Topics: Artist NewsOn TourReviews
  • Friday, May 25, 2018
    Friday, May 25, 2018

    Joshua Redman is joined by drummer Brian Blade, bassist Scott Colley, and cornetist Ron Miles for Still Dreaming, an album inspired by his father Dewey Redman's band Old and New Dreams, out now. That band had an all-star lineup of Ornette Coleman collaborators: Don Cherry, Charlie Haden, and Ed Blackwell. "Consistently riveting," says the Washington Post. "It all makes for a jazz adventure that begs for repeated listening," says the Lexington Herald-Leader. "The more you tune in, the more you hear the present day curators of a sublime jazz legacy forging its music into something unmistakably new."

    Journal Topics: Album ReleaseArtist NewsReviews
[{"parent":{"title":"Get on the list !","body":" Get exclusive information about NONESUCH tour dates, video premieres and special announcements ","field_newsletter_id":"14075483","field_label_list_id":"6389157","field_display_rates":"-1","field_preview_mode":"false","field_lbox_height":"","field_lbox_width":"","field_toaster_timeout":"16000","field_toaster_position":"From Bottom","field_turnkey_height":"800"}}]

Performs On