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Timothy Andres to Make London Debut at Wigmore Hall on Friday, June 8

  • Thursday, March 29, 2012
    Timothy Andres to Make London Debut at Wigmore Hall on Friday, June 8

    American composer-pianist Timothy Andres will make his London debut at Wigmore Hall on Friday, June 8, with a concert that marks the opening of the venue’s latest summer Late Night Series. The solo recital will focus on Andres’s own music and that of his contemporaries, as well as some of his major influences, such as Brahms and Schumann. Tickets are on sale now at wigmore-hall.org.uk.

    Before then, Andres has a number of US performances ahead, including a show at the BAM Café in Brooklyn with NOW Ensemble, a special night with the Brad Mehldau Trio at the Newman Center in Denver, and a solo piano recital at (Le) Poisson Rouge in New York City. For additional details and tickets links, go to nonesuch.com/on-tour.

    As noted earlier this week in the Nonesuch Journal, Andres's music was featured on a number of concert programs in Los Angeles this weekend, including a piece from his debut album, Shy and Mighty, at Beyond Baroque, and Andres himself joining the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra on piano for the world premiere of his Old Keys and the West Coast premiere of his re-composition of Mozart's "Coronation" Concerto. "What is most original about Andres’ music so far is its extraordinary pianistic character," writes the Los Angeles Times' Mark Swed in his review of the concerts. "He is a superb pianist with a highly evolved rhythmic sense and a quirky sense of humor."

    Praised for his "acute ear" by the New York Times and a "stubborn nose" by The New Yorker, Timothy Andres composes work that crosses boundaries and defies categorization. When his Nonesuch Records debut, Shy and Mighty, was released in 2010, critic Alex Ross observed "an unhurried grandeur that has rarely been felt in American music since John Adams came on the scene … more mighty than shy." "Andres is unquestionably a distinctive talent, with a fine teasing ear for texture and harmony," wrote Andrew Clements in the Guardian. "This sequence of nine movements glides across stylistic boundaries in a totally unselfconscious way."

    Andres was an undergraduate at Yale University when critics and fellow composers began to take notice of his skills as both writer and pianist. In 2004, Ross said of him: "He is a formidable pianist who has the measure of Charles Ives’s towering ‘Concord Sonata.’ He is also a composer. Most notably, his music is beginning to show an individual voice, which is the hardest thing for a composer to achieve."

    Though steeped in the classical canon, Andres has expressed his admiration for a range of artists, like Radiohead, Brian Eno, Múm, Sigur Rós, Wolf Parade, Arcade Fire, LCD Soundsystem, Olivia Tremor Control, and Boards of Canada. His classical influences include John Adams, Charles Ives, György Ligeti, and his former teachers, Ingram Marshall and Martin Bresnick. His next recording for Nonesuch is scheduled for 2013.

    Following the successes of the Late Night Series last season, Wigmore Hall has unveiled the latest collection of hour-long concerts for this summer. Featuring a great diversity of programs, from madrigals by Monteverdi to Damnalot (Faust the musical), this series also presents some favorite Schubert Lieder and a world premiere that fuses the Indian sarod with a Western orchestra.

on March 23, 2012 - 6:03pm
Excerpt: 

Timothy Andres will make his London debut at Wigmore Hall on Friday, June 8, with a concert that marks the opening of the venue’s latest summer Late Night Series. The solo recital will focus on Andres’s own music and that of his contemporaries, as well as some of his major influences, like Brahms and Schumann. Before then, Andres has a number of US performances ahead, including a concert with the Brad Mehldau Trio in Denver.

Copy: 

American composer-pianist Timothy Andres will make his London debut at Wigmore Hall on Friday, June 8, with a concert that marks the opening of the venue’s latest summer Late Night Series. The solo recital will focus on Andres’s own music and that of his contemporaries, as well as some of his major influences, such as Brahms and Schumann. Tickets are on sale now at wigmore-hall.org.uk.

Before then, Andres has a number of US performances ahead, including a show at the BAM Café in Brooklyn with NOW Ensemble, a special night with the Brad Mehldau Trio at the Newman Center in Denver, and a solo piano recital at (Le) Poisson Rouge in New York City. For additional details and tickets links, go to nonesuch.com/on-tour.

As noted earlier this week in the Nonesuch Journal, Andres's music was featured on a number of concert programs in Los Angeles this weekend, including a piece from his debut album, Shy and Mighty, at Beyond Baroque, and Andres himself joining the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra on piano for the world premiere of his Old Keys and the West Coast premiere of his re-composition of Mozart's "Coronation" Concerto. "What is most original about Andres’ music so far is its extraordinary pianistic character," writes the Los Angeles Times' Mark Swed in his review of the concerts. "He is a superb pianist with a highly evolved rhythmic sense and a quirky sense of humor."

Praised for his "acute ear" by the New York Times and a "stubborn nose" by The New Yorker, Timothy Andres composes work that crosses boundaries and defies categorization. When his Nonesuch Records debut, Shy and Mighty, was released in 2010, critic Alex Ross observed "an unhurried grandeur that has rarely been felt in American music since John Adams came on the scene … more mighty than shy." "Andres is unquestionably a distinctive talent, with a fine teasing ear for texture and harmony," wrote Andrew Clements in the Guardian. "This sequence of nine movements glides across stylistic boundaries in a totally unselfconscious way."

Andres was an undergraduate at Yale University when critics and fellow composers began to take notice of his skills as both writer and pianist. In 2004, Ross said of him: "He is a formidable pianist who has the measure of Charles Ives’s towering ‘Concord Sonata.’ He is also a composer. Most notably, his music is beginning to show an individual voice, which is the hardest thing for a composer to achieve."

Though steeped in the classical canon, Andres has expressed his admiration for a range of artists, like Radiohead, Brian Eno, Múm, Sigur Rós, Wolf Parade, Arcade Fire, LCD Soundsystem, Olivia Tremor Control, and Boards of Canada. His classical influences include John Adams, Charles Ives, György Ligeti, and his former teachers, Ingram Marshall and Martin Bresnick. His next recording for Nonesuch is scheduled for 2013.

Following the successes of the Late Night Series last season, Wigmore Hall has unveiled the latest collection of hour-long concerts for this summer. Featuring a great diversity of programs, from madrigals by Monteverdi to Damnalot (Faust the musical), this series also presents some favorite Schubert Lieder and a world premiere that fuses the Indian sarod with a Western orchestra.

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Thursday, March 29, 2012 - 09:30
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Timothy Andres

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