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Randy Newman's "Austin City Limits" Debut Re-Airs on PBS

on July 10, 2014 - 5:49pm
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Randy Newman's debut performance on Austin City Limits will receive an encore broadcast when the show airs the 2011 episode on PBS this weekend. "With songs that run the gamut from heartbreaking to satirical and a host of unforgettable film scores," says the show, "Randy Newman has used his many talents to create musical masterpieces widely recognized by generations of audiences." The show first aired in November 2011, the same week his latest album, Live in London, was released on Nonesuch Records. Watch a sneak peek from the show here.

 

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Randy Newman's debut performance on Austin City Limits will receive an encore broadcast when ACL, the longest-running live music television series in history, airs the 2011 episode dedicated exclusively to his work on PBS stations across the United States this weekend.

"With songs that run the gamut from heartbreaking to satirical and a host of unforgettable film scores," says the show, "Randy Newman has used his many talents to create musical masterpieces widely recognized by generations of audiences."

Newman's Austin City Limits debut first aired in November 2011, the same week his latest album, Live in London, was released on Nonesuch Records. The set list for this Saturday's show features 17 songs from throughout Newman's career, including favorites like "Short People," "Political Science," and "You Can Leave Your Hat On," each of which he performs on the Live in London CD+DVD as well. To pick up a copy of Live in London, head to the Nonesuch Store, where CD+DVD orders include a free download of the music at checkout.

You can watch his solo Austin City Limits performance of "You’ve Got a Friend in Me," from Toy Story, here:

 

 

Publish date: 
Thursday, July 10, 2014 - 11:00
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Randy Newman: "Austin City Limits" (2011) w

Laurie Anderson's "Homeland," Her First Studio Album in Nearly Ten Years, Out Now

on June 22, 2010 - 12:13pm
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Laurie Anderson's long-awaited new album, Homeland, her first studio record in nearly a decade, is out now. Canada's Globe and Mail gives the album four stars, saying it is "blessed with some of the most vivid soundscapes of her career ... [T]he wealth of acoustic detail ensures that there’s something new to discover with each re-hearing." Fenway Bergamot, Anderson's male alter ego, delivers his fifth and final video in the series at nonesuch.com/media.

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Laurie Anderson's long-awaited new album, Homeland, her first studio record in nearly a decade, is out on Nonesuch today. As noted yesterday in the Nonesuch Journal, Pitchfork rates the album 8.3, calling it "an exquisite state-of-the-union dispatch as only Anderson, America's darkly comic conscience, can provide ... The music is spacious, mercurial, and thoroughly conceived." The Los Angeles Times, Baltimore Sun, and the Independent (UK) give it four stars. Australia's Courier-Mail calls it "some of the most striking music of Anderson's career." MusicOMH gives the album a perfect five stars, exclaiming, "what a work of art it is."

Canada's Globe and Mail also gives the album four stars. "Laurie Anderson is so good with words that it’s easy to forget she’s a songwriter and not someone who just speaks over music," says reviewer J. D. Considine. "Homeland is a major corrective in that regard, and not just because it’s blessed with some of the most vivid soundscapes of her career." Considine explains that "the wealth of acoustic detail ensures that there’s something new to discover with each re-hearing." Read the review at theglobeandmail.com.

Fenway Bergamot, Anderson's male alter ego, is featured on the album cover and on the track "Another Day in America," which the Independent, in its four-star review of the album, describes as its centerpiece. Over the past five weeks, through a weekly series of short videos on Nonesuch.com, he has offered further insight into recent days in America and broader contemporary culture. In the fifth and final video in the series, now available at nonesuch.com/media, Bergamot imagines the pastoral life of a troubadour, with all that might entail—the good, the bad, the fantastical.

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Anderson spoke with Salon.com's Margaret Eby about Bergamot, Homeland, her recent smash Music for Dogs concert in Sydney, and what Eby sees as Anderson's pivotal role in the mainstreaming of what was once avant-garde, like performance artist Marina Abramovic's successful foray at New York's Museum of Modern Art and, well, all that Lady Gaga does.

"The avant-garde has taken over," says Eby, "and it all started with Laurie Anderson. The godmother of the New York art scene, Anderson and her pioneering performances loom large over contemporary artists and musicians."

Anderson is quick to deflect such notions and revels her "secret ambitions to just be a comedian. That's what I'd really like to do, stand-up comedy." Read more of what she has to say in the in-depth interview at salon.com.

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Canada's National Post caught up with Anderson during her recent trip to London, for the first public appearance from Bergamot, whom the Post's Mike Doherty says "provides the album's oddly moving centrepiece." Doherty and Anderson discuss Homeland and the daunting process she undertook of combing through myriad recorded files to create the album. You'll find the article at nationalpost.com.

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And for further insight into the making of the record, there's an excerpt from "Homeland: The Story of the Lark," the 40-minute documentary included with the album, also at nonesuch.com/media.

To pick up a copy of the Homeland CD/DVD, head to the Nonesuch Store.

Publish date: 
Tuesday, June 22, 2010 - 12:00
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Laurie Anderson: "Homeland" [cover]

Wall Street Journal: "Antifogmatic" Conveys "Color, Wit, Flash, Tenderness" with "Remarkable Musicianship, High Spirits"

on June 21, 2010 - 1:57pm
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Following a weekend at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival, Punch Brothers return to their adopted home of New York City to perform songs from their new album, Antifogmatic, in Brooklyn on Wednesday. The Wall Street Journal talks with the band about New York's influence on the album, which the Journal says "brims with color, wit, flash and tenderness, all conveyed with remarkable musicianship and high spirits." You can watch Punch Brothers perform "This Is the Song" in New York, off the deluxe edition of Antifogmatic, at nonesuch.com/media.

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Punch Brothers continued to celebrate the release of their latest Nonesuch album, Antifogmatic, with a return to the Telluride Bluegrass Festival in Telluride, Colorado, this weekend, performing multiple sets at the musical gathering that first brought band mates Chris Thile and Noam Pikelny together back in 2005. The band returns to its adopted home of New York City to perform at Brooklyn's Music Hall of Williamsburg on Wednesday.

In today's Wall Street Journal, Thile, Pikelny, and fellow Punch Brother Gabe Witcher talk with Jim Fusilli, the Journal's rock and pop music critic, about life in New York City. They discuss how having a shared home city allowed for greater collaboration and contributed to the music of Antifogmatic, however one might describe it, "perhaps bluegrass with the discipline of classical music and the unexpected angles of rock," Fusilli suggests.

In the article, Fusilli says of the new album: "Antifogmatic brims with color, wit, flash and tenderness, all conveyed with remarkable musicianship and high spirits."

Being in New York also allowed the quintet to come together for regular performances at the downtown club The Living Room to work out the new songs and perform a wide variety of others, performances from which are featured on the DVD included with the deluxe edition of Antifogmatic.

"They may have set their bluegrass roots here in the city,"  Fusilli concludes, "but with Antifogmatic the Punch Brothers are declaring that they won't be pigeonholed."

Read the complete article at online.wsj.com.

You can watch The Living Room performance of "This Is the Song" (pictured at the top left), off the deluxe edition of Antifogmatic, at nonesuch.com/media. And to pick up a copy of the album, head to the Nonesuch Store.

Publish date: 
Monday, June 21, 2010 - 11:00
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Punch Brothers p-Bingo "This Is the Song"

Video: Laurie Anderson on the Making of "Homeland"; PopMatters Calls It "An Incredible Work of Art Pop of the Highest Order"

on June 15, 2010 - 2:33pm
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With just one week left till the release of Laurie Anderson's Homeland comes the fourth in a series of videos featuring Anderson's male alter ego, Fenway Bergamot. Also new at nonesuch.com is an excerpt from the documentary included with the album, in which Anderson discusses the challenges of making the record and the invaluable support of Lou Reed. PopMatters calls Homeland "an incredible work of art pop of the highest order ... one of the most riveting and poignant accounts of post-9/11 America pop music has offered to date."

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With just one week left till the release of Homeland, Laurie Anderson's first studio album in nearly a decade, that leaves just a few more days to hear the entire record streaming online at NPR.org, where Bob Boilen, host of NPR's All Songs Considered, says the project examines "the everyday, in new and inventive ways."

In that vein, Fenway Bergamot, Anderson's male alter ego, has been looking at various elements of contemporary life, everyday and otherwise, adding his own unique perspective to each, in the weekly video series on Nonesuch.com. Today's fourth episode of five, "On the Road," examines life on the road and how it affects one's perception of the world. See what he has to say at nonesuch.com/media.

Also new to nonesuch.com/media is a five-and-a-half-minute excerpt from "Homeland: The Story of the Lark," a documentary on the making of the project from filmmaker Braden King. The full-length, 41-minute film is featured on the DVD included with the album. In the excerpt, Anderson discusses the challenges involved in gathering the thousands of files she had assembled for the project over the years, the daunting task of creating a single album from them, and the invaluable support she received from her husband and Homeland co-producer Lou Reed throughout the process. Reed offers his perspective as well, as does album engineer Mario McNulty. Watch it now at nonesuch.com/media.

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PopMatters rates Homeland a nine out of ten. Reviewer Ron Hart says the album is "easily her most enjoyable and pop friendly work since 1982’s Big Science." Though the subject matter may be beyond traditional pop fare, "if you fully lend yourself to the mission of its message, you will be treated to an incredible work of art pop of the highest order," writes Hart, "loaded with about as many killer cameos as the new Roots album, How I Got Over," including Reed, Four Tet's Kieran Hebden, John Zorn, and Antony Hegarty.

The reviewer concludes that, "regardless of where you stand politically, theologically or environmentally, or even with regards to the challenging, avant-garde nature of her sound, you cannot deny the power of Anderson’s Homeland, one of the most riveting and poignant accounts of post-9/11 America pop music has offered to date."

Read the complete review at popmatters.com.

Publish date: 
Tuesday, June 15, 2010 - 14:00
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Laurie Anderson: "Homeland: The Story of the Lark" (excerpt)

Nonesuch Launches Laurie Anderson "Homeland" Video Series Featuring Her Alter Ego, Fenway Bergamot

on May 25, 2010 - 12:27pm
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Laurie Anderson's latest Nonesuch release, Homeland, is out now. In the month leading up to release day, Nonesuch released one short video clip featuring Anderson's male alter ego, Fenway Bergamot, every Tuesday. In the inaugural clip, Bergamot revisits the early days of the 2008 financial crisis. BAM has announced that Anderson will give the NY premiere of her new work, Delusion, at the Next Wave Festival this fall.

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Homeland, Laurie Anderson's forthcoming Nonesuch release and her first studio album in nearly a decade, is due out one month from today, on June 22. To count down the weeks till then, Nonesuch Records will release one short video clip featuring Anderson's male alter ego, Fenway Bergamot, every Tuesday now through release day at nonesuch.com/media.

In these clips, Bergamot, who can be heard on the Homeland track "Another Day in America" and seen both on the album cover and in its DVD documentary "Homeland: The Story of the Lark," muses on various topics related to the album and its take on contemporary American culture. The documentary and these weekly clips were directed by filmmaker Braden King.

In today's inaugural clip, titled "The Crash," Bergamot revisits the early days of the financial meltdown of 2008. Here, he invokes a classic film trope to warn listeners of the impending doom, exclaiming: "There's trouble out at the mine!" Here it straight from Bergamot at nonesuch.com/media, and head back each week through June 22 for more.

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Anderson is currently on her way to Sydney, Australia, with her husband, Lou Reed, for the start of the multimedia Vivid Live Festival they are curating and performing in at the Sydney Opera House. In one of her Vivid Live performances, Anderson will perform songs from her latest piece, Delusion. Now comes word that she will bring the piece back home this fall for its New York premiere in a dozen performances at the Brooklyn Academy of Music's Harvey Theater in September and October for the 2010 Next Wave Festival. For more information on these and other upcoming performances, visit nonesuch.com/on-tour.

Publish date: 
Tuesday, May 25, 2010 - 13:00
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Laurie Anderson: "Homeland" [cover]

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