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  • The second and last album pairing guitar virtuoso Ali Farka Touré and kora master Toumani Diabaté, Ali and Toumani won the Grammy Award for Best Traditional World Music Album. Recorded in 2005, with contributions from Cachaíto López on bass, the album is the successor to the Grammy-winning In the Heart of the Moon and is the last recorded by both Touré and López. Pitchfork says it's "uncommonly beautiful." NPR calls it "breathtaking."

  • The second and last album pairing guitar virtuoso Ali Farka Touré and kora master Toumani Diabaté, Ali and Toumani won the Grammy Award for Best Traditional World Music Album. Recorded in 2005, with contributions from Cachaíto López on bass, the album is the successor to the Grammy-winning In the Heart of the Moon and is the last recorded by both Touré and López. Pitchfork says it's "uncommonly beautiful." NPR calls it "breathtaking."

  • Savane is the final recording from Malian guitar legend Ali Farka Touré, the “King of Desert Blues,” who passed away in 2006. The Guardian (UK) calls it “an African classic … remarkable for its sheer variety and passion.”

  • The winner of the 2005 Grammy for Best Traditional World Music Album, In the Heart of the Moon brings together Malian guitarist Ali Farka Toure and kora master Toumani Diabaté for "an album of breathtaking instrumental sorcery" (The Times, UK). Also featuring contributions from Ry Cooder, it was called "the most beautiful music on earth" by MOJO.

  • This double disc collects essential vintage recordings from the late Malian guitar master Ali Farka Toure. These previously vinyl-only classic tracks first ignited interest in the artist dubbed "the John Lee Hooker of Africa."

  • Culled from sessions that guitarist Ali Farka Toure recorded for Malian national radio in the ’70s, "these hypnotic performances," says MOJO, "established his reputation in Africa, and they still have the power to take the breath away."

  • Feeling that his travels abroad were weakening the link between the music and its source, Ali Farka Touré retuned to farming in his hometown of Niafunké, where producer Nick Gold brought a mobile studio to capture Touré in his own environment. Throughout the recording, Touré was moving between rice fields and the studio, yet the results are some of his best recordings. Q says the "Malian rootsman returns, thunderously, to his roots." Songlines calls it "sublime."

  • Ali Farka Touré's collaboration with Ry Cooder, Talking Timbuktu, was recorded in just three days in Los Angeles in 1993. Relaxed and accessible, the music is complimented by Cooder's subtle guitar work and sensitive production while retaining the integrity of Touré's performance. Mojo says: "Three days of studio spontaneity prove the innate compatibility of two traditions." Billboard calls it "a triumphant collaboration." Grammy Award Winner for Best World Music Album.

  • On The Source, Ali Farka Touré's vision opens even further to include a full backing band and further forays into the electric guitar. Taj Mahal, Rory Mcleod, and Nitin Sawhney (who contributes tabla on "Inchana Massina") weave into Touré's dense musical tapestry while his philosophical and spiritual perceptions are enhanced by his protégé Afel Bocoum's gentle narration. The Guardian says the album is "as atmospheric and mesmeric as anything he's done and ... there's a greater range to his playing and singing."

  • The River expands the acoustic journeys of Ali Farka Touré's debut album to include sax from Steve Williamson and input from members of the Chieftains, and with "Heygana" there's even a hint of reggae. Calabash player Amadou Cisse provides rhythmic accompaniment. Folk Roots calls it a "fast forward in terms of excellence."

  • Ali Farka Touré's debut for World Circuit truly captures the essence of his unique "desert blues" style and rightly launched his career internationally. Sung in several different Malian languages, the songs here are mostly unaccompanied, showcasing his fluid guitar playing and haunting vocals. Largely recorded in London, it features a rare live version of "Amandrai" captured during 1987's Crossing The Border Festival. Q says the album "shows Touré's continuing flair and inventiveness."