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  • This seven-disc box set contains all Nonesuch recordings of Polish composer Henryk Górecki's works—Lerchenmusik, Symphony No. 3, String Quartets Nos. 1–3, Miserere, Kleines Requiem für eine Polka, Harpsichord Concerto, and Good Night—as well as the newly released first recording of Górecki's final composition, Symphony No. 4, Tansman Episodes, which was completed by Górecki’s son Mikolaj after his father's death. "A commanding, haunting farewell … a conscious summing-up," says the New Yorker of the final piece; "the ailing composer may have sensed that it would be his valediction."

  • This seven-disc box set contains all Nonesuch recordings of Polish composer Henryk Górecki's works—Lerchenmusik, Symphony No. 3, String Quartets Nos. 1–3, Miserere, Kleines Requiem für eine Polka, Harpsichord Concerto, and Good Night—as well as the newly released first recording of Górecki's final composition, Symphony No. 4, Tansman Episodes, which was completed by Górecki’s son Mikolaj after his father's death. "A commanding, haunting farewell … a conscious summing-up," says the New Yorker of the final piece; "the ailing composer may have sensed that it would be his valediction."

  • This first recording of Henryk Górecki’s final composition, Symphony No. 4, Tansman Episodes, was made during its 2014 world premiere at Royal Festival Hall with the London Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Andrey Boreyko. The piece, which pays homage to composer Alexsander Tansman, was incomplete at the time of Górecki's death. However the score had precise indications for orchestration, which Górecki’s son Mikolaj, also a composer, used to complete it. "This swansong turned out to be extraordinary: playful, dramatic and tender," says the Boston Globe, "an ambitious, hypnotic work … a meditation on the many styles he adopted and developed during a long and successful career."

  • This is the first vinyl LP of the beloved 1992 Nonesuch recording of Górecki’s Symphony No. 3, Symphony of Sorrowful Songs. Featuring the London Sinfonetta and soprano Dawn Upshaw, this recording of the Polish composer's 1976 work proved spellbinding to a diverse international audience. The LP, pressed on 180-gram vinyl, includes a download of the complete album. TIME calls it "a transcendental meditation on mortality and redemption."

  • Sunrise of the Planetary Dream Collector: Music of Terry Riley, released in honor of the composer's 80th birthday, includes a new recording of the title piece, one of Kronos and Riley’s first collaborations, as well as a previously unreleased recording of Lacrymosa – Remembering Kevin and Cry of a Lady (originally released on A Thousand Thoughts) and G Song and Cadenza on the Night Plain (both originally released on 25 Years). Pitchfork says the album is "a necessary addition to the catalog," calling the new recording of the title track "a marvel."

  • Released in honor of composer Terry Riley’s 80th birthday, One Earth, One People, One Love: Kronos Plays Terry Riley, a five-disc box set of albums of his work composed for, and performed by, his longtime friends and champions Kronos Quartet, includes three albums previously released by Nonesuch—Salome Dances for Peace (two discs), Requiem for Adam, and The Cusp of Magic —as well as a new disc called Sunrise of the Planetary Dream Collector, which includes a new recording of the title piece. All of the pieces, says the Independent, "are, typically, timeless."

  • The label debut from Tyondai Braxton, HIVE1 comprises eight pieces originally conceived for a performance work called HIVE that debuted at New York’s Guggenheim Museum in 2013 and evolved into HIVE1. The Washington Post has called Braxton "one of the most acclaimed experimental musicians of the last decade." Q calls the album "a sonically absorbing experience." NPR says: "[W]hat sets this album apart is its playfulness—the feeling that experimenting with sound is a joyful game."

  • Steve Reich’s album Radio Rewrite features the first recording of the 2012 title piece, which references two songs by Radiohead and is performed by Alarm Will Sound led by Alan Pierson; Electric Counterpoint (1987), performed by Radiohead guitarist Jonny Greenwood; and Piano Counterpoint, a 2011 transcription by Vincent Corver of Reich’s 1973 Six Pianos performed by pianist Vicky Chow, a member of Bang on a Can All-Stars. The Observer calls the title piece "instantly accessible, instantly enjoyable." NME says of the album: "Deeply affecting, this is a great showcase of a compelling mind."

  • Nico Muhly’s opera, Two Boys was recorded live during the Metropolitan Opera’s 2013 production with conductor David Robertson and director Bartlett Sher, featuring mezzo-soprano Alice Coote and tenor Paul Appleby. The opera, featuring a libretto by award-winning playwright Craig Lucas, is loosely based on true events and follows a lonely detective whose investigation of a seemingly simple crime draws her into a complex web of online intrigue. The New Yorker praised Two Boys as a “bighearted, fearless work.” BBC Music Magazine lauds “Muhly’s radiant post-minimalistic score.” The Independent on Sunday calls it "enthralling." Opera magazine says this "excellent" recording confirms "the arrival on the operatic scene of a mature and striking new compositional voice."

  • Louis Andriessen's Grawemeyer Award–winning film opera La Commedia, a collaboration with director Hal Hartley, is based on Dante's Divine Comedy, with additional texts including the Old Testament's "Song of Songs." This two-CD-plus-DVD set of the Dutch National Opera production features the Asko | Schönberg Ensembles, led by Reinbert de Leeuw. The Washington Post calls La Commedia "an exciting, powerful and rich piece that shows Andriessen at the top of his game." The Los Angeles Times considers it "the greatest opera of the century so far."

  • John Adams's City Noir (2009), inspired by LA "noir" films of the 1940s and '50s, and the debut recording of his 2012 Saxophone Concerto are performed here by the St. Louis Symphony led by David Robertson, featuring saxophonist Timothy McAllister. "Dense, brash and exuberant," says the New York Times, "these two stellar works by John Adams are love letters to the confidence of the 1950s and a time when some of the greatest feats of virtuosity were often performed in smoky jazz clubs ... McAllister sizzles." Grammy Award Winner: Best Orchestral Performance.

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