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Featured Releases

  • Released in honor of composer Terry Riley’s 80th birthday, One Earth, One People, One Love: Kronos Plays Terry Riley, a five-disc box set of albums of his work composed for, and performed by, his longtime friends and champions Kronos Quartet, includes three albums previously released by Nonesuch—Salome Dances for Peace (two discs), Requiem for Adam, and The Cusp of Magic —as well as a new disc called Sunrise of the Planetary Dream Collector, which includes a new recording of the title piece. Pre-orders include an instant download of G Song.

  • Composer George Crumb’s title piece, called "an unusually elevated and searing Vietnam War protest" by the New York Times, sets a dark, powerful tone for this collection, which addresses the political/physical/spiritual consequences of war. London’s Evening Standard includes the album among its “100 Definitive Classical CDs of the 20th Century.”

  • Minimalist progenitor Terry Riley wrote this ambitious piece for Kronos. “The Quartet,” says the New York Times, “mingles Asian modes, static drones, Arabic melodic arabesques and non-tempered tunings with dissonant Bartókian counterpoint, bluesy inflections, jazzy syncopations, and Minimalist repetition.”

  • On the Grammy-winning Different Trains, performed by Kronos Quartet, Reich evokes his American childhood during World War II while also addressing the Holocaust. The New York Times declared it “a work of such originality that ‘breakthrough’ seems the only possible description.” Pat Metheny performs Electric Counterpoint.

  • Kronos draws from a remarkable range of composers, including Arvo Pärt, Astor Piazzolla, Terry Riley, John Lurie, John Zorn. USA Today called it “the most inviting collection of 20th-century music in a long time, easily Kronos' most cohesive album.”

  • Brilliantly eclectic collection features South African composer Kevin Volans’s title piece. Ben Johnston’s “Amazing Grace,” says the New York Times, “is a canny blend of modernist skill and folkish Americana worth the price of the record all by itself.”

  • The Quartet’s best-selling Nonesuch debut includes its now legendary interpretation of Jimi Hendrix’s “Purple Haze.” The Washington Post praised the group’s “breadth of vision” throughout a collection “devoted to some of the most imaginative music of our time.”

  • Director Paul Schrader's highly stylized vision of the life of Japanese author Yukio Mishima finds "its textures made more shimmering by the Philip Glass score," featuring Kronos Quartet, says The New Yorker. Glass, Schrader, and costume designer Eiko Ishioka shared a "Best Artistic Contribution" Award at the 1985 Cannes Film Festival.

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