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  • Michael Feinstein, a premiere interpreter of the American songbook, is joined by legendary composer, arranger, lyricist, performer, and accompanist Hugh Martin for a set of duo performances that encompass the breadth of Martin's career, including his work on Broadway and at MGM, like the classic “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas.”

  • Michael Feinstein, a premiere interpreter of the American songbook, is joined by legendary composer, arranger, lyricist, performer, and accompanist Hugh Martin for a set of duo performances that encompass the breadth of Martin's career, including his work on Broadway and at MGM, like the classic “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas.”

  • Michael Feinstein celebrates Tony Award–winning composer Jerry Herman with songs from throughout Herman's career, including Mame, Hello, Dolly!, and La Cage aux Folles, with the composer accompanying and contributing guest vocals as well.

  • The follow-up to their 1990 collection, singer Michael Feinstein and composer/pianist Burt Lane reunite to perform songs by the Tin Pan Alley tunesmith. "The album reveals Lane's ability to spin out solid melodies for any occasion," says the Los Angeles Times.

  • Throughout his career, Jule Styne collaborated with a wide range of artists, including Bix Beiderbecke, Frank Loesser, and Stephen Sondheim. On this "intriguing and affectionate disc" (Washington Post), he joins Michael Feinstein in performing many of his greatest contributions to the American Songbook, including “I Fall in Love too Easily" and a medley from Gypsy.

  • For the first in his Songbook Series for Nonesuch, Feinstein is accompanied by Burton Lane, the composer of such classic shows as Babes on Broadway and Finian's Rainbow, on some of Lane's best-known tunes, plus two new songs. “With Feinstein singing his heart out and Lane firing off brilliant, fiercely syncopated accompaniments on piano," says the Chicago Tribune, “one might think the heyday of the songplugger had never ended."