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  • Thursday, December 27, 2007
    nothing

    "American cinema produced one flat-out masterpiece this year—Paul Thomas Anderson's There Will Be Blood," says CNN's Tom Charity, who also calls the film "extraordinary" in his review of the year on screen. The writer was less charitable with some of the year's other artistic efforts, though he does compliment The Wire, proposing that most of the attempts at high-art movies in 2007 "don't measure up to the best TV series: The Wire, Deadwood, and The Sopranos, for example."

    Journal Topics: Film Reviews
  • Thursday, December 27, 2007
    nothing

    The Boston Herald's James Verniere writes that the year's best movie music was Jonny Greenwood's "entire, diabolically mesmerizing score for There Will Be Blood." In a separate article, he names the "insanely brilliant" film among the year's best as well.

    Journal Topics: Film Reviews
  • Tuesday, December 25, 2007
    nothing

    Of all the efforts at big-scale movie storytelling over the past several months, writes J. Hoberman in the Village Voice, Paul Thomas Anderson's There Will Be Blood is "the one that packs the strongest movie-movie wallop." He continues: "This is truly a work of symphonic aspirations and masterful execution. Anderson's superb filmmaking is complemented throughout by Radiohead guitarist Jonny Greenwood's excellent score—at once modernist and rhapsodic, full of discordant excitements, outer-space siren trills, and the rumble of distant thunder ... There's hardly a dull moment."

    Journal Topics: Film Reviews
  • Tuesday, December 25, 2007
    nothing

    In her review of There Will Be Blood, New York Times film critic Monohla Dargis calls the new Paul Thomas Anderson film a "breakthrough" for its director and "above all a consummate work of art." Furthermore, she writes, "its pleasures are unapologetically aesthetic. It reveals, excites, disturbs, provokes, but the window it opens is to human consciousness itself." Daniel Day-Lewis gives "a thrilling performance, among the greatest I’ve seen," writes Dargis, "purposefully alienating and brilliantly located at the juncture between cinematic realism and theatrical spectacle."

    Journal Topics: Film Reviews
  • Tuesday, December 25, 2007
    nothing

    MTV's Kurt Loder says that Jonny Greenwood's score for There Will Be Blood is among the "wonderful" parts of Paul Thomas Anderson's new film. Loder calls Anderson's decision to hire Greenwood an "audacious" one, and one that paid off, with the end result an outstanding work independent of the film for which it was written: "The music is an orchestral wash of beautifully harmonized melodies spiked with thoroughly modern dissonance, and while it's a jarring accompaniment for some of the imagery, it stands on its own as a series of superbly astringent compositions."

    Journal Topics: Reviews
  • Saturday, December 22, 2007
    nothing

    "Spellbinding" says CBS Sunday Morning's film critic David Edelstein of Tim Burton's film adaptation of Stephen Sondheim's Sweeney Todd. "Sondheim, our greatest living theatrical composer and lyricist," Edelstein says, "has never been so deliciously served."

    Journal Topics: Film Reviews Television
  • Saturday, December 22, 2007
    nothing

    New York Times film critics Manohla Dargis and Stephen Holden both rate Paul Thomas Anderson's There Will Be Blood at the top of their lists of favorite films of the year. Dargis writes that it was one of the two films of 2007 that "matter most to me, that dug in the deepest and rearranged my own givens ... that shook up my world in the best possible way." And Holden compares There Will Be Blood to three classic American films, while recognizing that the director has created something entirely new as well. Anderson's film, Holden writes, "suggests a fusion of East of Eden, Giant, and Citizen Kane with the Hollywood finery ripped to shreds."

    Journal Topics: Film Reviews
  • Saturday, December 22, 2007
    nothing

    Joshua Redman's Back East is number one on New York Times music critic Ben Ratliff's list of the best CDs of 2007. Summing up the record, Ratliff writes: "Here Mr. Redman compresses his goals, leaves distractions behind and makes the most agile and personal record of his career." Back East makes fellow Times critic Nate Chinen's best-of list as well. Redman, Chinen writes, "has never sounded more at ease than he does here," and the performance by Joshua's father, late saxophonist Dewey Redman, in his last studio recording, "raises stakes as well as hairs."

    Journal Topics: Reviews
  • Thursday, December 20, 2007
    nothing

    New York Times film critic A. O. Scott, in his review of the Tim Burton–directed Sweeney Todd, calls the film "something close to a masterpiece, a work of extreme—I am tempted to say evil—genius." What is on display in the film is "some of the finest stage music of the past 40 years," which, in all its gory vividness, might be seen as "infernal," writes Scott, "except that you might just as well call it heavenly."

    Journal Topics: Film Reviews
  • Thursday, December 20, 2007
    nothing

    Tim Burton, in adapting Stephen Sondheim's Sweeney Todd for the big screen, has done so "with a bravura visual style thrillingly in touch with the timelessly depraved delights of Grand Guignol," says the Washington Post. Burton's adaptation of Sweeney Todd will prove to be "the brilliant singing splatterfest that finally gives [Sondheim] a stab at cinematic immortality."

    Journal Topics: Film Reviews
  • Thursday, December 20, 2007
    nothing

    "They've done it," says TIME magazine's Richard Corliss. They, that is, the entire creative team behind the new film version of Stephen Sondheim's Sweeney Todd, have made a "bloody great" film adaptation of the original play that is at once "both faithful and liberating." Corliss finds that Johnny Depp, "a magnificent star at the apogee of his powers," excels in the title role as "a true singing actor, making every note as persuasive as his words and gestures." And of the director, it feels to Corliss as though "Sweeney Todd might have been written for Burton."

    Journal Topics: Film Reviews
  • Thursday, December 20, 2007
    nothing

    The Wall Street Journal calls Tim Burton's film version of Sweeney Todd a "brilliant, blood-soaked" adaptation of the Stephen Sondheim original. The film "takes pleasure in its own theatricality, gives pleasure with caustic wit, trusts the power of Stephen Sondheim's score and exults in flights of fancy that only a movie can provide ... Like Sweeney with his razor, Tim Burton's movie grabs you and won't let go."

    Journal Topics: Film Reviews

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