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  • Monday, December 17, 2007
    nothing

    Wilco's Sky Blue Sky was the BBC Radio 6 Album of the Day today, as part of the station's weeklong run-down of the year's best according to its various presenters. Shaun Keaveny, host of the weekday Breakfast Show, named the album his pick for the year's best.

    Journal Topics: Radio Reviews
  • Monday, December 17, 2007
    nothing

    It was a powerhouse line-up when SFJAZZ gathered Joshua Redman, Brad Mehldau, Christian McBride, and Brian Blade at San Francisco's Herbst Theatre with a tribute to Thelonius Monk on May 4 of this year, so it's no surprise that the Contra Costa Times says it was one of the best jazz concerts of the year. 

    Journal Topics: Reviews
  • Monday, December 17, 2007
    nothing

    Jonny Greenwood's There Will Be Blood soundtrack is out in the UK today, and musicOMH says the music sets the scene well for the film's early-2008 release there. "As scene setting goes," says the site, "this is something pretty exceptional, the rising melody lingering in the memory even after the first listen." Come Oscar time, "the judges would do well to consider this fine piece of film writing." Regardless, "As a piece of music in its own right the group of pieces works handsomely ... There's an urgency and tension throughout that makes it difficult to ignore."

    Journal Topics: Film Reviews
  • Sunday, December 16, 2007
    nothing

    Time Out New York, though reluctant to use the word "masterpiece" for fear of contributing to its overuse, says Paul Thomas Anderson's There Will Be Blood, earning a perfect six stars, is worthy of the word: "[T]he writer-director’s attempt to map the moment when bootstrap mentality curdles into cutthroat corporate culture earns the title. There hasn’t been a more breathtaking, damning portrait of frontier paranoia since [Robert Altman's] McCabe & Mrs. Miller."

    Journal Topics: Film Reviews
  • Sunday, December 16, 2007
    nothing

    CBS Sunday Morning's film critic David Edelstein counts Paul Thomas Anderson's There Will Be Blood as "the jewel" among holiday releases. Edelstein calls the film "a psychodrama with the epic scale of an Old Testament parable," and says Daniel Day-Lewis, in the lead role, "looms as large as the derricks that dominate the unruly landscape." Even the film's already-controversial final scene is, in Edelstein's opinion, "brilliant," all part of the "mad American classic" Anderson has created.

    Journal Topics: Film Reviews
  • Thursday, December 13, 2007
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    NPR's music programs and reviewers are turning in their lists for the Best of 2007, and a number of Nonesuch artists are among the top choices from public radio. Wilco's Sky Blue Sky tops World Cafe's list of the best albums of the year. All Things Considered's Banning Eyre has three Nonesuch albums among his Top Ten of 2007: Caetano Veloso's , Sérgio and Odair Assad's Jardim Abandonado, and Youssou N'Dour's Rokku Mi Rokka (Give and Take). On the list for "Top Ten Jazz Jewels of 2007" from WDUQ is Metheny/Mehldau Quartet. And Wilco's "Hate It Here," from Sky Blue Sky, is among the best songs of the year, per KUT.

    Journal Topics: Radio Reviews
  • Thursday, December 13, 2007
    nothing

    In its review of the new big-screen version of Stephen Sondheim's Sweeney Todd, Rolling Stone calls the film "a thriller-diller from start to finish: scary, monstrously funny and melodically thrilling ... This Sweeney is a bloody wonder, intimate and epic, horrific and heart-rending as it flies on the wings of Sondheim's most thunderously exciting score." The review exclaims that the "brilliantly conceived and executed film moves from one highlight to another."

    Journal Topics: Film Reviews
  • Thursday, December 13, 2007
    nothing

    "Watershed highlights what lang does best," says MOJO magazine of k.d. lang's upcoming Nonesuch release: "fulsome, ballads sung with precision-timing, intelligence, and a humorous twist." The new record, writes MOJO's Lucy O'Brien, is "reflective and wistful." In keeping with that tone, Watershed "shows lang revisiting the wry country style of her early work  ... layering her laconic delivery with lush, seductive harmonies."

    Journal Topics: Reviews
  • Wednesday, December 12, 2007
    nothing

    Jonny Greenwood's score for There Will Be Blood was recently acclaimed in a Los Angeles Times article as signaling "new heights of inspiration" for director Paul Thomas Anderson's use of music in film. In this week's Time Out London, writer Sharon O'Connell further explores the interplay between movies and music in her review of Greenwood's score, saying: "[A] soundtrack needs to be so dynamic as to propel or even predict a narrative/mood, to be aesthetically empathetic to the nth degree and yet, it must guard against standing out from the movie like a large pair of creatively aggressive bollocks. That's a tall order ... Jonny Greenwood has long since proven himself up to the task."

    Journal Topics: Reviews
  • Tuesday, December 11, 2007
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    While calling the Oscars at this point is still the gamble of the year, the Guardian's Jeremy Kay decided to get in on the game after seeing Paul Thomas Anderson's "deliriously barmy tale" There Will Be Blood. "If the white knuckles of Daniel Day-Lewis aren't squeezed around the lead actor statuette come February 24, 2008," writes Kay, "I'll be stupefied. Which is precisely how I felt after watching his performance as Daniel Plainview, a masterful amalgam of determination and loneliness that was so utterly compelling I crushed the hand of the poor soul sitting next to me out of sheer terror."

    Journal Topics: Film Reviews
  • Tuesday, December 11, 2007
    nothing

    "These are flush times artistically for film music," says Variety, "with epic scores back in vogue and newer voices only growing in authority." First in this new filmic new wave is Jonny Greenwood's music for Paul Thomas Anderson's There Will Be Blood, calling it "a darkly haunting orchestral tapestry willfully indebted to some of the great composers of the 20th century."

    Journal Topics: Film Reviews
  • Tuesday, December 11, 2007
    nothing

    Jardim Abandonado, the latest album from Sérgio and Odair Assad, was reviewed in today's edition of All Things Considered on NPR. Says Banning Eyre, these "legends of the classical-guitar world" have done their instrument and their precursors proud. Listen to the review here.

    Journal Topics: Radio Reviews

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