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  • Thursday, April 8, 2021
    Composer Donnacha Dennehy Awarded Guggenheim Fellowship
    Britt Olsen­-Ecker

    Congratulations to composer Donnacha Dennehy, who has been awarded a 2021 Guggenheim Fellowship. He joins a diverse group of 184 artists, writers, scholars, and scientists to be so honored by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation this year. The candidates were chosen through a rigorous peer-review process from almost 3,000 applicants.

    Created in 1925 by Senator Simon and Olga Guggenheim in memory of their son John Simon Guggenheim, the Foundation has offered fellowships to exceptional individuals in pursuit of scholarship in any field of knowledge and creation in any art form, under the freest possible conditions.

    “I am thrilled to announce this new group of Guggenheim Fellows,” said Edward Hirsch, President of the Foundation, “especially since this has been a devastating year in so many ways. A Guggenheim Fellowship has always been meaningful, but this year we know it will be a lifeline for many of the new Fellows at a time of great hardship, a survival tool as well as a creative one. The work supported by the Fellowship will help us understand more deeply what we are enduring individually and collectively, and it is an honor for the Foundation to help the Fellows do what they were meant to do.”

    Since its establishment in 1925, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation has granted nearly $400 million in Fellowships to over 18,000 individuals, among whom are more than 125 Nobel laureates, members of all the national academies, winners of the Pulitzer Prize, Fields Medal, Turing Award, Bancroft Prize, National Book Award, and other internationally recognized honors.

    Donnacha Dennehy has released two albums on Nonesuch Records: The Hunger (2019), which explores the emotional, political, and socioeconomic devastation of Ireland’s Great Famine, performed by Alarm Will Sound, soprano Katherine Manley, and sean nós singer Iarla Ó Lionáird; and Grá agus Bás (2011), performed by Crash Ensemble, comprising the title piece, inspired by sean-nós vocal music, featuring O’Lionáird, and That the Night Come, a song cycle of Yeats poems, featuring Dawn Upshaw.

    Journal Articles:Artist News

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Composer Donnacha Dennehy Awarded Guggenheim Fellowship

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on April 8, 2021 - 9:00am
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Thursday, April 8, 2021 - 09:00
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Congratulations to composer Donnacha Dennehy, who has been awarded a 2021 Guggenheim Fellowship. He joins a diverse group of 184 artists, writers, scholars, and scientists to be so honored by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation this year. “I am thrilled to announce this new group of Guggenheim Fellows,” said Edward Hirsch, President of the Foundation, “especially since this has been a devastating year in so many ways. A Guggenheim Fellowship has always been meaningful, but this year we know it will be a lifeline for many of the new Fellows at a time of great hardship, a survival tool as well as a creative one. The work supported by the Fellowship will help us understand more deeply what we are enduring individually and collectively, and it is an honor for the Foundation to help the Fellows do what they were meant to do.”

Copy: 

Congratulations to composer Donnacha Dennehy, who has been awarded a 2021 Guggenheim Fellowship. He joins a diverse group of 184 artists, writers, scholars, and scientists to be so honored by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation this year. The candidates were chosen through a rigorous peer-review process from almost 3,000 applicants.

Created in 1925 by Senator Simon and Olga Guggenheim in memory of their son John Simon Guggenheim, the Foundation has offered fellowships to exceptional individuals in pursuit of scholarship in any field of knowledge and creation in any art form, under the freest possible conditions.

“I am thrilled to announce this new group of Guggenheim Fellows,” said Edward Hirsch, President of the Foundation, “especially since this has been a devastating year in so many ways. A Guggenheim Fellowship has always been meaningful, but this year we know it will be a lifeline for many of the new Fellows at a time of great hardship, a survival tool as well as a creative one. The work supported by the Fellowship will help us understand more deeply what we are enduring individually and collectively, and it is an honor for the Foundation to help the Fellows do what they were meant to do.”

Since its establishment in 1925, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation has granted nearly $400 million in Fellowships to over 18,000 individuals, among whom are more than 125 Nobel laureates, members of all the national academies, winners of the Pulitzer Prize, Fields Medal, Turing Award, Bancroft Prize, National Book Award, and other internationally recognized honors.

Donnacha Dennehy has released two albums on Nonesuch Records: The Hunger (2019), which explores the emotional, political, and socioeconomic devastation of Ireland’s Great Famine, performed by Alarm Will Sound, soprano Katherine Manley, and sean nós singer Iarla Ó Lionáird; and Grá agus Bás (2011), performed by Crash Ensemble, comprising the title piece, inspired by sean-nós vocal music, featuring O’Lionáird, and That the Night Come, a song cycle of Yeats poems, featuring Dawn Upshaw.

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Donnacha Dennehy 2019 by Britt Olsen­-Ecker

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