Skip directly to content
Browse by:
  • Tuesday, September 28, 2010
    David Simon, Creator of "The Wire," Named a 2010 MacArthur Fellow

    Congratulations to David Simon, who has just been named a MacArthur Fellow. Simon, the creator of such acclaimed television series as The Wire (to which Nonesuch released the official soundtracks in 2008) and Treme, was among the 23 new MacArthur Fellows for 2010 named earlier today by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. This year's class includes, in addition to Simon, a stone carver, a quantum astrophysicist, a jazz pianist, a high school physics teacher, a marine biologist, a theater director, an American historian, a fiction writer, an economist, and a computer security scientist. All were selected for their creativity, originality, and potential to make important contributions in the future.

    The recipients just learned, through a phone call out of the blue from the Foundation, that they will each receive $500,000 in “no strings attached” support over the next five years. MacArthur Fellowships, often referred to as "Genius" grants, come without stipulations and reporting requirements and offer Fellows unprecedented freedom and opportunity to reflect, create, and explore. Soprano Dawn Upshaw was named a Fellow in 2007.

    “This group of Fellows, along with the more than 800 who have come before, reflects the tremendous breadth of creativity among us,” said MacArthur President Robert Gallucci. “They are explorers and risk takers, contributing to their fields and to society in innovative, impactful ways. They provide us all with inspiration and hope for the future.”

    “There is something palpable about these new MacArthur Fellows, about their character as explorers and pioneers at the cutting edge. These are women and men improving, protecting, and making our world a better place for us all. This program was designed for such people—designed to provide an extra measure of freedom, visibility, and opportunity,” said Daniel J. Socolow, Director of the MacArthur Fellows Program.

    The inaugural class of MacArthur Fellows was named in 1981. Including this year’s Fellows, 828 people, ranging in age from 18 to 82 at the time of their selection, have been named MacArthur Fellows since the inception of the program 30 years ago.

    For more information, visit macfound.org.

    Journal Articles:Artist News

Enjoy This Post?

Share This Post

David Simon, Creator of "The Wire," Named a 2010 MacArthur Fellow

Browse by:
nonesuch's picture
on September 28, 2010 - 1:43pm
Article Type: 
Publish date: 
Tuesday, September 28, 2010 - 13:00
Excerpt: 

Congratulations to David Simon, the creator of The Wire (to which Nonesuch released the soundtrack) and Treme, who was named a MacArthur Fellow for 2010. The Fellows, selected for their creativity, originality, and potential to make important contributions in the future, receive $500,000 each in “no strings attached” support over the next five years. MacArthur Fellowships, often referred to as "Genius" grants, offer Fellows unprecedented freedom and opportunity to reflect, create, and explore. Dawn Upshaw was named a Fellow in 2007.

Copy: 

Congratulations to David Simon, who has just been named a MacArthur Fellow. Simon, the creator of such acclaimed television series as The Wire (to which Nonesuch released the official soundtracks in 2008) and Treme, was among the 23 new MacArthur Fellows for 2010 named earlier today by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. This year's class includes, in addition to Simon, a stone carver, a quantum astrophysicist, a jazz pianist, a high school physics teacher, a marine biologist, a theater director, an American historian, a fiction writer, an economist, and a computer security scientist. All were selected for their creativity, originality, and potential to make important contributions in the future.

The recipients just learned, through a phone call out of the blue from the Foundation, that they will each receive $500,000 in “no strings attached” support over the next five years. MacArthur Fellowships, often referred to as "Genius" grants, come without stipulations and reporting requirements and offer Fellows unprecedented freedom and opportunity to reflect, create, and explore. Soprano Dawn Upshaw was named a Fellow in 2007.

“This group of Fellows, along with the more than 800 who have come before, reflects the tremendous breadth of creativity among us,” said MacArthur President Robert Gallucci. “They are explorers and risk takers, contributing to their fields and to society in innovative, impactful ways. They provide us all with inspiration and hope for the future.”

“There is something palpable about these new MacArthur Fellows, about their character as explorers and pioneers at the cutting edge. These are women and men improving, protecting, and making our world a better place for us all. This program was designed for such people—designed to provide an extra measure of freedom, visibility, and opportunity,” said Daniel J. Socolow, Director of the MacArthur Fellows Program.

The inaugural class of MacArthur Fellows was named in 1981. Including this year’s Fellows, 828 people, ranging in age from 18 to 82 at the time of their selection, have been named MacArthur Fellows since the inception of the program 30 years ago.

For more information, visit macfound.org.

featuredimage: 
David Simon

Related Posts

  • Friday, July 30, 2021
    Friday, July 30, 2021

    Randy Newman is a special surprise guest caller on the latest episode of Office Hours Live with Tim Heidecker. "You truly are a hero to me," Heidecker says. "You're in the Top Three. C&C Music Factory is No. 1." You can hear their conversation here. Newman's set at Newport Folk Festival's "Folk On" last Saturday was among "The 10 Best Things We Saw" there, says Rolling Stone. "Randy Newman delivered a typically powerful 19-song solo piano set ... blending his signature mix of intentionally inscrutable ambiguity, caustic satire, and gorgeously wounded romanticism."

    Journal Topics: Artist NewsPodcast
  • Thursday, July 29, 2021
    Thursday, July 29, 2021

    The Black Keys have released the official music video for "Stay All Night," one of several Junior Kimbrough tunes they perform on their new album, Delta Kream. Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney are joined by Kenny Brown on guitar and Eric Deaton on bass, both long-time members of the bands of blues legends including Kimbrough and R.L. Burnside. The video was directed by Ryan Nadzam and filmed in Mississippi at Jimmy Duck Holmes’ Blue Front Café, the oldest active juke joint in America. You can watch it here.

    Journal Topics: Artist NewsVideo
[{"parent":{"title":"Get on the list !","body":" Get exclusive information about NONESUCH tour dates, video premieres and special announcements ","field_newsletter_id":"14075483","field_label_list_id":"6389157","field_display_rates":"-1","field_preview_mode":"false","field_lbox_height":"","field_lbox_width":"","field_toaster_timeout":"16000","field_toaster_position":"From Bottom","field_turnkey_height":"800"}}]

Performs On