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  • Tuesday, July 13, 2021
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    Congratulations to the cast and crew of Spike Lee's film of David Byrne's American Utopia, which has been nominated for six Emmy Awards: Outstanding Variety Special (Pre-Recorded); Outstanding Directing for a Variety Special; Outstanding Lighting Design/Lighting Direction for a Variety Special; Outstanding Music Direction; Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Variety Series or Special; and Outstanding Technical Direction, Camerawork, Video Control for a Special. Winners will be announced on Sunday, September 19, just two days after David Byrne's American Utopia returns to Broadway at the St. James Theatre. 

    Journal Topics: Artist News Television
  • Monday, July 12, 2021
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    "They were both fearless, pushing back against the severe music that seemed to dominate the modern composition landscape during the 1960s and 1970s, the same music that was, by the way, a major part of Nonesuch’s identity during that period," writes Nonesuch Records Chairman Emeritus Bob Hurwitz, in a remembrance of composers Louis Andriessen and Frederic Rzewski. "Neither was afraid to reference vernacular music, and jazz, and popular and folk music, and most importantly, both embraced a tonal language that was out of favor at the moment they were coming of age as composers. Their music was deadly serious at times, and polemical and political, but it could be humorous, and always filled with humanity."

    Journal Topics: Artist News Staff
  • Monday, July 12, 2021
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    Dan Auerbach will make his directorial debut in a documentary feature about Dr. John, aka Mac Rebennack. RadicalMedia has announced its partnership with Auerbach for the project, which will tell a story about the storied musician and Rock and Roll Hall of Famer, who died in 2019, and his impact in music and on the culture. Auerbach, who produced Dr. John's 2012 Grammy-winning Nonesuch album, Locked Down, says: "I’m still learning bits about him that I never knew, and I hope the movie provides a lens into the story of the life of Dr. John."

    Journal Topics: Artist News Film
  • Monday, July 12, 2021
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    Punch Brothers guitarist Chris "Critter" Eldridge is on the podcast Inside the Musician's Brain to talk with host Chris Pandolfi of The Infamous Stringdusters from the Telluride Bluegrass Festival, where Punch Brothers, a mainstay of the festival, returned to perform last month. "Critter is really an astounding acoustic guitar player," says Pandolfi. "I've always loved his playing." You can hear their conversation here.

    Journal Topics: Artist News Podcast
  • Friday, July 9, 2021
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    The Black Keys perform "Poor Boy a Long Way From Home," an R.L. Burnside tune from their new album, Delta Kream, live from Mississippi at Jimmy Duck Holmes’ Blue Front Café, the oldest active juke joint in America, in a new video. Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney are joined by Kenny Brown on guitar and Eric Deaton on bass, both long-time members of the bands of blues legends including Burnside and Junior Kimbrough. You can watch it here.

    Journal Topics: Artist News Video
  • Thursday, July 8, 2021
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    Rachael & Vilray—Lake Street Dive singer-songwriter Rachael Price and composer, singer, and guitarist Vilray—kick off a ten-concert tour of the United States with three performances in Colorado this weekend, including a set as special guest of The Avett Brothers at Red Rocks Amphitheatre. The tour continues throughout July and into August with shows in Illinois, Connecticut, New York, Massachusetts, and Maine.

    Journal Topics: Artist News On Tour
  • Tuesday, July 6, 2021
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    Lake Street Dive has announced a dozen new tour dates for the fall, with shows in Nevada, California, Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, Virginia, and New Jersey through October. They follow the band's previously announced summer and early fall shows.

    Journal Topics: Artist News
  • Thursday, July 1, 2021
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    Composer Louis Andriessen died today at a care home in Weesp, North Holland, at the age of 82. Andriessen was once described by the Guardian as “not only the leading Dutch composer of our time, but one of the most important figures in European music in the last half century, whose influence has spread far beyond that of his own works.” Over thirty years, he released nine recordings on Nonesuch, from De Staat in 1991 to his final work, The only one, earlier this year.

    Journal Topics: Artist News
  • Thursday, July 1, 2021
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    Lake Street Dive's Rachael Price and Mike Calabrese are the guests on the latest episode of the Your Last Meal podcast. The talk with host Rachel Belle about how they met in college, the dive-bar origin of the group's name, and, of course, per the show's title, the meal they would choose as their last. You can hear their surprising choices and join Belle in going down the rabbit holes to which they lead in the episode here.

    Journal Topics: Artist News Podcast
  • Wednesday, June 30, 2021
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    Caroline Shaw and Sō Percussion have released a video of "To the Sky," a track from their new album, Let the Soil Play Its Simple Part, performed live. You can watch the video, directed by Maureen Towey and filmed at Bok in Philadelphia, here. "'To the Sky' quietly awakens with gentle humming and a softly rumbling marimba," writes NPR Music's Tom Huizenga. "Gradually the song blooms, and near the end Caroline Shaw's voice bursts open in pure radiant sunshine. It's another stunning moment in the career of the composer." The new album "showcases Shaw's flexible voice—clear as a mountain stream, flowing with expression in many directions."

    Journal Topics: Artist News Video
  • Wednesday, June 30, 2021
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    Rhiannon Giddens spoke with WNYC's Radiolab for its miniseries The Vanishing of Harry Pace and with NPR's Radio Diaries for its feature "The Rise and Fall of Black Swan Records," both about the groundbreaking life of Pace, who, a century ago, founded Black Swan Records, the first major Black-owned record company, and launched the careers of Ethel Waters and Louis Armstrong, and what happened next. "This period—basically between emancipation and the Harlem Renaissance—it is the key to our American character," Giddens says.

    Journal Topics: Artist News Podcast Radio
  • Tuesday, June 29, 2021
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    Emmylou Harris and the Nash Ramblers' Ramble in Music City: The Lost Concert, due September 3 on Nonesuch, features the 1990 Nashville debut of the acoustic all-star group—Sam Bush, Roy Huskey Jr., Larry Atamanuik, Al Perkins, Jon Randall Stewart—at the Tennessee Performing Arts Center (TPAC). The concert was recorded and shelved until now, when it has been unearthed and will be released for the first time. The set features entirely different songs from the band's acclaimed live album At the Ryman, with music by A.P. Carter, Rodney Crowell, Ruth Franks, the Louvin Brothers, Doc Pomus, Paul Simon, Townes Van Zandt, and Harris herself. Nonesuch Store pre-orders include an exclusive print autographed by Harris, while they last. You can watch the band's 1993 Austin City Limits performance of the track “Roses in the Snow” here.

    Journal Topics: Album Release Artist News Video

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