Skip directly to content
Browse by:
  • Tuesday, December 11, 2007
    NPR: Assads New Album Takes Guitar to New Levels

    Jardim Abandonado, the latest album from Sérgio and Odair Assad, was reviewed in today's edition of All Things Considered on NPR. Says Banning Eyre, these "legends of the classical-guitar world" have done their instrument and their precursors proud:

    Sérgio and Odair Assad came up in the wake of Andres Segovia, widely credited with legitimizing guitar as a classical instrument. With their maturity and dazzling technical skills, the Assads easily qualify as masters in the house that Andre built. But happily, they aim for more. By bringing Latin-American music, jazz, original compositions and any other thing they please into the mix, they remain interlopers—loyal more to the humble, shape-shifting guitar than to any musical genre.

    And even amidst works by Jobim, Gershwin, and Debussy, Eyre says "the CD's most electrifying composition," is a piece by Sérgio himself.

    Listen to that piece and to Eyre's review here:

    Journal Articles:RadioReviews

Enjoy This Post?

Share This Post

NPR: Assads New Album Takes Guitar to New Levels

Browse by:
nonesuch's picture
on December 10, 2007 - 11:18pm
Article Type: 
Publish date: 
Tuesday, December 11, 2007 - 01:15
Excerpt: 

Jardim Abandonado, the latest album from Sérgio and Odair Assad, was reviewed in today's edition of All Things Considered on NPR. Says Banning Eyre, these "legends of the classical-guitar world" have done their instrument and their precursors proud. Listen to the review here.

Copy: 

Jardim Abandonado, the latest album from Sérgio and Odair Assad, was reviewed in today's edition of All Things Considered on NPR. Says Banning Eyre, these "legends of the classical-guitar world" have done their instrument and their precursors proud:

Sérgio and Odair Assad came up in the wake of Andres Segovia, widely credited with legitimizing guitar as a classical instrument. With their maturity and dazzling technical skills, the Assads easily qualify as masters in the house that Andre built. But happily, they aim for more. By bringing Latin-American music, jazz, original compositions and any other thing they please into the mix, they remain interlopers—loyal more to the humble, shape-shifting guitar than to any musical genre.

And even amidst works by Jobim, Gershwin, and Debussy, Eyre says "the CD's most electrifying composition," is a piece by Sérgio himself.

Listen to that piece and to Eyre's review here:

featuredimage: 
Sérgio and Odair Assad "Jardim Abandonado" [cover]

Related Posts

  • Friday, July 23, 2021
    Friday, July 23, 2021

    Rhiannon Giddens is on NPR's World Cafe to perform three songs from her new album with Francesco Turrisi, They're Calling Me Home—"Black as Crow," "Calling Me Home," and "O Death"—and talk with host Raina Douris about the album. You can hear the session here.

    Journal Topics: Artist NewsRadio
  • Wednesday, June 30, 2021
    Wednesday, June 30, 2021

    Rhiannon Giddens spoke with WNYC's Radiolab for its miniseries The Vanishing of Harry Pace and with NPR's Radio Diaries for its feature "The Rise and Fall of Black Swan Records," both about the groundbreaking life of Pace, who, a century ago, founded Black Swan Records, the first major Black-owned record company, and launched the careers of Ethel Waters and Louis Armstrong, and what happened next. "This period—basically between emancipation and the Harlem Renaissance—it is the key to our American character," Giddens says.

    Journal Topics: Artist NewsPodcastRadio
[{"parent":{"title":"Get on the list !","body":" Get exclusive information about NONESUCH tour dates, video premieres and special announcements ","field_newsletter_id":"14075483","field_label_list_id":"6389157","field_display_rates":"-1","field_preview_mode":"false","field_lbox_height":"","field_lbox_width":"","field_toaster_timeout":"16000","field_toaster_position":"From Bottom","field_turnkey_height":"800"}}]

Performs On