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  • Tuesday, April 28, 2020
    Watch: Jeremy Denk Talks Bach with Timo Andres, Others for Greene Space Series

    Jeremy Denk led the second event of Bach's Well-Tempered Lens, a three-part online series for WNYC/WQXR's The Greene Space in New York City, with "The Mysterious Life of J.S. Bach" last night. From his barn in upstate New York, Denk leads a distanced discussion of the person behind the music with Bach scholar and author Daniel R. Melamed, composer Melinda Wagner, New Yorker staff writer James Wood, and composer/pianist (and fellow Nonesuch artist) Timo Andres. You can watch it here:

    The series began with "The Well-Tempered Clavier’s Greatest Hits" earlier this month and continues with “How to Think Like Bach” on Monday, May 11, part discussion, part listening session examining what the human mind does when hearing Bach.

    “Listening to Jeremy Denk play Bach," says Jennifer Sendrwo, the Greene Space Executive Producer, "is a powerful antidote to life’s chaos, bringing people together to revel in music that transcends time and continues to inspire joy and provoke our curiosity.”

    Jeremy Denk recorded Bach's Goldberg Variations for an album released on Nonesuch Records in 2013, and performed Bach's Chromatic Fantasia and Fugue in D Minor, BWV 903, on his 2019 album, c. 1300–c. 2000. He can be heard performing John Adams's "I Still Play (Pocket Variations)" on the upcoming I Still Play, an album of solo piano compositions by artists who have recorded for Nonesuch, written in honor of the label’s longtime President Bob Hurwitz.

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Watch: Jeremy Denk Talks Bach with Timo Andres, Others for Greene Space Series

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on April 28, 2020 - 9:00am
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Tuesday, April 28, 2020 - 09:00
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Jeremy Denk led the second event of Bach's Well-Tempered Lens, a three-part online series for WNYC/WQXR's The Greene Space in NYC, with "The Mysterious Life of J.S. Bach." From his barn in upstate New York, Denk leads a distanced discussion of the person behind the music with Bach scholar and author Daniel R. Melamed, composer Melinda Wagner, New Yorker staff writer James Wood, and composer/pianist (and fellow Nonesuch artist) Timo Andres. You can watch it here.

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Jeremy Denk led the second event of Bach's Well-Tempered Lens, a three-part online series for WNYC/WQXR's The Greene Space in New York City, with "The Mysterious Life of J.S. Bach" last night. From his barn in upstate New York, Denk leads a distanced discussion of the person behind the music with Bach scholar and author Daniel R. Melamed, composer Melinda Wagner, New Yorker staff writer James Wood, and composer/pianist (and fellow Nonesuch artist) Timo Andres. You can watch it here:

The series began with "The Well-Tempered Clavier’s Greatest Hits" earlier this month and continues with “How to Think Like Bach” on Monday, May 11, part discussion, part listening session examining what the human mind does when hearing Bach.

“Listening to Jeremy Denk play Bach," says Jennifer Sendrwo, the Greene Space Executive Producer, "is a powerful antidote to life’s chaos, bringing people together to revel in music that transcends time and continues to inspire joy and provoke our curiosity.”

Jeremy Denk recorded Bach's Goldberg Variations for an album released on Nonesuch Records in 2013, and performed Bach's Chromatic Fantasia and Fugue in D Minor, BWV 903, on his 2019 album, c. 1300–c. 2000. He can be heard performing John Adams's "I Still Play (Pocket Variations)" on the upcoming I Still Play, an album of solo piano compositions by artists who have recorded for Nonesuch, written in honor of the label’s longtime President Bob Hurwitz.

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Jeremy Denk, Timo Andres: "Mysterious Life of J.S. Bach," Greene Space, April 2020

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