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  • Monday, April 6, 2020
    Watch: Rhiannon Giddens Releases "Trees on the Mountain" Video Featuring Nashville Ballet

    Rhiannon Giddens has released a music video for "Trees on the Mountain" after a song from there is no Other, her 2019 Nonesuch album with Francesco Turrisi. The video was directed by William Kaner and choreographed by Nashville Ballet Artistic Director Paul Vasterling, and features company artists from Nashville Ballet. Giddens previously worked with Nashville Ballet for her score to last year's Shakespeare-inspired ballet Lucy Negro Redux, which was hailed as “a seismic shift in dance” by the Nashville Scene and “the kind of miracle Nashville has never seen before” by the New York Times.

    Dancers Mollie Sansone, Brett Sjoblom, and Owen Thorne help bring to life Giddens’ and Turrisi’s piano-driven piece, which was originally an aria from Carlilse Floyd's 1956 opera, Susannah. The video was shot in black-and-white and mostly filmed on a dark empty theater stage. You can watch it here:

    As noted last week in the Nonesuch Journal, Rhiannon Giddens has joined with musician Amanda Palmer and author Neil Gaiman to create Art Is Alive, a new online resource guide to support artistic and creative freelance communities whose livelihoods have been so greatly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. "We are hoping that this website can act as a kind of general yellow pages for the current money emergency in the art and music world," they say. "We like to call it our COVID-19 directory of give and take." Art Is Alive also offers a place for artists to interact, to share information as new events, new resources, and new ideas develop.

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Watch: Rhiannon Giddens Releases "Trees on the Mountain" Video Featuring Nashville Ballet

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on April 6, 2020 - 9:30am
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Monday, April 6, 2020 - 10:00
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Rhiannon Giddens has released a music video for "Trees on the Mountain" after a song from there is no Other, her 2019 Nonesuch album with Francesco Turrisi. The video was directed by William Kaner and choreographed by Nashville Ballet Artistic Director Paul Vasterling, and features company artists from Nashville Ballet. Giddens previously worked with Nashville Ballet for her score to last year's Shakespeare-inspired ballet Lucy Negro Redux. You can watch it here.

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Rhiannon Giddens has released a music video for "Trees on the Mountain" after a song from there is no Other, her 2019 Nonesuch album with Francesco Turrisi. The video was directed by William Kaner and choreographed by Nashville Ballet Artistic Director Paul Vasterling, and features company artists from Nashville Ballet. Giddens previously worked with Nashville Ballet for her score to last year's Shakespeare-inspired ballet Lucy Negro Redux, which was hailed as “a seismic shift in dance” by the Nashville Scene and “the kind of miracle Nashville has never seen before” by the New York Times.

Dancers Mollie Sansone, Brett Sjoblom, and Owen Thorne help bring to life Giddens’ and Turrisi’s piano-driven piece, which was originally an aria from Carlilse Floyd's 1956 opera, Susannah. The video was shot in black-and-white and mostly filmed on a dark empty theater stage. You can watch it here:

As noted last week in the Nonesuch Journal, Rhiannon Giddens has joined with musician Amanda Palmer and author Neil Gaiman to create Art Is Alive, a new online resource guide to support artistic and creative freelance communities whose livelihoods have been so greatly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. "We are hoping that this website can act as a kind of general yellow pages for the current money emergency in the art and music world," they say. "We like to call it our COVID-19 directory of give and take." Art Is Alive also offers a place for artists to interact, to share information as new events, new resources, and new ideas develop.

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Rhiannon Giddens: "Trees on the Mountain" feat. Nashville Ballet [video]

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