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Paraguay: Guaraní Songs & Dances / Los Chiriguanos

Paraguay: Guaraní Songs & Dances / Los Chiriguanos cover art
79727

Track Listing

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About this Album

In order to provide a historical context for this recording, the liner notes that accompanied its original release have been reprinted in full. —Ed.

Paraguayan folk music is gay, gentle, and optimistic, based poetically on images and comparisons taken from nature, melodically on the subtle intertwining of Guaraní and Spanish tradition, rhythmically on syncopation of every inner segment of a beat. American audiences may be surprised to hear the Guaraní harp, played in a virile, astringent style, bringing to the ear the sound of rain, to the skin the feel of warm sun, to the eyes views of far valleys and hills. This is an earthly harp. It is vigorous and masculine, expressive of many and diverse sentiments, like the man who plays it.


Los Chiriguanos are two men from the tribe of Chirigua, which belongs to the language group of the Guaraní, Indians who have lived in Central South America since long before the Spaniards came in 1527.


Angel Sanabria, who plays guitar and sings, was born in San Antonio, Paraguay. He came to Paris, where he now lives, several years ago with the Latin-American ballet of Joaquin Perez Fernandez. Later he toured Europe and the Orient with other members of the ballet, before beginning to sing alone at l’Escale, where he met his partner.


Pablo Vicente Morel, the harpist, was born in Hiaty, Paraguay. He began to play the Guaraní harp when he was very young, and has appeared with many Argentinean and Paraguayan groups in South America. He too came to Europe as a member of a group invited to tour various European countries. When the tour was finished, however, he became very ill. It was only after a long and painful convalescence, during which he was forbidden to play, that he was well enough to return to work. Pablo Vicente made his harp himself. It has 37 strings and resembles the ancient minstrel harp and the large Irish harp. This is the harp that will “make evil spirits fly, make the rivers stop flowing, make the cattle forget to eat.”


CYNTHIA GOODING, 1968

Credits

MUSICIANS
Los Chiriguanos
Angel Sanabria, vocals, guitar
Pablo Vicente Morel, harp

PRODUCTION CREDITS
Originally released in 1968
Recorded and produced by Fred Hellerman
Mastered by Robert C. Ludwig
Coordinator: Teresa Sterne

Re-mastered by Robert C. Ludwig
Design: Doyle Partners
Cover Photograph: © Steve McCurry / Magnum Photos

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