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  • Laurie Anderson: "Homeland"—"A Troubador"

    Fenway Bergamot, Laurie Anderson's male alter ego, featured on her 2010 album Homeland, imagines life as a troubadour in pastoral France, with all that might entail—the good, the bad, the fantastical.

  • Laurie Anderson on the Making of "Homeland"

    In this excerpt from "Homeland: The Story of the Lark," the documentary on the making of Laurie Anderson's Homeland included with the album, Anderson discusses the challenges involved in gathering the thousands of files she had assembled for the project over the years, the daunting task of creating a single album from them, and the unfailing support she received from her husband and Homeland co-producer Lou Reed throughout the process. Reed offers his perspective here as well, as does album engineer Mario McNulty. The documentary is by filmmaker Braden King.

  • Laurie Anderson: "Homeland"—"On the Road"

    Fenway Bergamot, Laurie Anderson's male alter ego, featured on her 2010 album Homeland, talks about life on the road and how it—more specifically making a hotel room home for the night—affects one's perception of the world.

  • Laurie Anderson: "Homeland"—"Victory"

    Fenway Bergamot, Laurie Anderson's male alter ego, featured on her 2010 album Homeland, reflects on simpler times and imagines the last sound some among us might hear before our final departure.

  • Laurie Anderson: "Homeland"—"Pictures and Things"

    Fenway Bergamot, Laurie Anderson's male alter ego, featured on her 2010 album Homeland, talks about recent cultural shifts towards the abstract, as money has become numbers on a screen and pictures have replaced things. "Pictures and Things" is also the title of the non-album track, featuring Antony Hegarty, on the B-side of the "Only an Expert" 12" vinyl single.

  • Laurie Anderson: "Homeland"—"The Crash"

    Fenway Bergamot, Laurie Anderson's male alter ego, featured on her 2010 album Homeland, revisits the early days of the financial meltdown of 2008. Here, he invokes a classic film trope to warn listeners of the impending doom, exclaiming: "There's trouble out at the mine!"