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  • With no synths, no drum kits, and every instrument unplugged, the pristine Realism is the flip-side to the brash noise-pop of The Magnetic Fields' 2008 Distortion. Singer-songwriter Stephin Merritt calls it "folk," but with its wide range of instrumentation and orchestrated arrangements, says Merritt, "Realism is a more kaleidoscopic approach to a genre.” The BBC calls it "absolutely prime Merritt." The vinyl album releases on February 9.

  • With no synths, no drum kits, and every instrument unplugged, the pristine Realism is the flip-side to the brash noise-pop of The Magnetic Fields' 2008 Distortion. Singer-songwriter Stephin Merritt calls it "folk," but with its wide range of instrumentation and orchestrated arrangements, says Merritt, "Realism is a more kaleidoscopic approach to a genre.” The BBC calls it "absolutely prime Merritt." The vinyl album releases on February 9.

  • For this MP3 EP, "Please Stop Dancing," from The Magnetic Fields' 2008 album Distortion, is paired with an alternate version of the album's "The Nun's Litany": a previously unreleased session cut with Stephin Merritt taking over vocals from Shirley Simms, who sings it on the album.

  • Wry lyrics combine with fuzzed-out guitar, cello, piano, and accordion for "bubblegum melodies in a bouquet of barbed wire" (MOJO); Stephin Merritt and Shirley Simms (69 Love Songs) trade off on lead vocals. Nonesuch Store bonus download with CD or vinyl: "The Man of a Million Faces," Merritt's solo song for NPR's Project Song. LP version includes complete album on CD and MP3.

  • The Magnetic Fields’ Nonesuch debut is darkly witty, ingeniously arranged, and conspicuously synth-free. NPR’s All Things Considered called Stephin Merritt’s songs “disciplined little gems of composition, poison-pen letters set in the first person ... Even under Merritt's dour storm clouds, they gleam.”