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Björk Launches Ten-Show NYC "Biophilia" Residency

Bjork by Carsten Windhorst 2011

In partnership with The Creators Project and the New York Hall of Science, Björk has brought her live Biophilia show to New York City for a special ten-show residency, starting tonight and running into March. Six performances will take place at the New York Hall of Science in Queens, New York City’s only hands-on science and technology museum. There will also be four performances at Roseland Ballroom in Manhattan. Head to nonesuch.com/on-tour for all of the dates.

Björk gave a glimpse of what's to come over the next month's residency in her performance on The Colbert Report earlier this week; you can watch her appearance here.

"When it comes to Iceland's iconic Björk (though New Yorkers can now claim her as one of their own), there seems to be no solitary path to her muse," writes the Wall Street Journal's Andy Beta in a preview of the residency. "Starting with 2001's Vespertine, each of her studio albums has involved more and more participants, be they hip-hop producers, harpists, or an Icelandic choir. That Björk topped herself with last year's Biophilia was quite the feat ..."

Biophilia premiered this past summer at the Manchester International Festival (MIF) in England in what the Wall Street Journal called "a magical evening," followed by a sold out residency in Björk’s hometown of Reykjavik, Iceland. Initially commissioned by MIF, the intimate performance finds Björk accompanied by a set of unique musical instruments created by a team including an Icelandic organ builder and a graduate of the MIT Media Lab. Among these creations are four ten-foot pendulum-harps, a MIDI-controlled pipe organ celeste re-fitted with bronze gamelan bars, and twin musical tesla coils. The performance also features an award-winning 24-piece Icelandic female choir and visuals from the Biophilia Apps with app developer Max Weisel performing on stage alongside Björk and musicians Manu Delago and Zeena Parkins.

In addition to the live performances, Björk has collaborated with the New York Hall of Science on a three-week-long Biophilia education series. Featuring interactive science and music workshops for middle-school children, the series leads students on an intensive study of the scientific concepts at the core of Biophilia’s songs, including crystalline structures, lunar phases, viruses, and more. Students will also learn to use the Biophilia Apps as tools for music composition and delve into the study of how music relates to nature. The city of Reykjavik is including the Biophilia educational project in its school curriculum for the next three years. The series debuted at the Manchester International Festival.

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