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Philip Glass's 75th Birthday Celebrated with Four-Day NYC Event for Tune-In Music Festival

  • Thursday, February 23, 2012
    Philip Glass's 75th Birthday Celebrated with Four-Day NYC Event for Tune-In Music Festival

    Composer Philip Glass turned 75 last month and celebrated in style with a birthday concert at (Le) Poisson Rouge and the US premiere of his Ninth Symphony at Carnegie Hall. The birthday celebrations continue this weekend with the Tune-In Music Festival's Celebrating the American Icon: Philip Glass at 75, a four-day event comprising five programs at the Park Avenue Armory in New York City, featuring Glass’s own music, including his landmark piece Music in Twelve Parts, as well as music, poetry, and art created and performed by those who influenced him and those whom he has influenced throughout his career.

    The festival kicks off tonight a world premiere from Bill Frisell, in which the guitarist will be joined by an eight-piece ensemble in accompanying a reading of poet Allen Ginsberg's Kaddish by Ginsberg collaborator Hal Willner and artist Ralph Steadman, who will create the visual design and staging to accompany the piece.

    On Friday night, Philip Glass will be joined by longtime collaborator Patti Smith for the sold-out event The Poet Speaks: music performances and readings celebrating their favorite poets, including Ginsberg and William Blake. This marks the first New York performance for the pair.

    Saturday promises another unforgettable, sold-out event when the Philip Glass Ensemble offers a rare performance of the entire Music in Twelve Parts (1971-74), an epic piece that Glass considers to be the culmination of his minimalist period. New York Times music writer Allan Kozinn calls it "the crowning work" of what may be his "most original and revolutionary" period. "Along with Terry Riley’s In C (1964) and Steve Reich’s Drumming (1971)," Kozinn writes, "it captures the energy and spirit of early Minimalism and is one of the canon’s defining essays." The piece runs a total of five hours, including two short intermissions and one hour-long dinner break.

    The Tune-In Music Festival's Philip Glass celebration concludes on Sunday with two events: an afternoon concert showcasing a number of artists assembled by Glass, including composer Nico Muhly with violist Nadia Sirota, the trio Tirtha, composer-pianist Tania Leon, and singer-songwriter Zack Glass; and an evening culminating concert featuring Glass’s Another Look at Harmony, a choral work he started in 1975 for organ and 100 voices, performed by the Brooklyn Youth Chorus, the Collegiate Chorale, and organist Michael Riesman, music director and keyboardist of the Philip Glass Ensemble.

    For more on the Tune-In Music Festival's Celebrating the American Icon: Philip Glass at 75, head to armoryonpark.org.

on February 22, 2012 - 2:29pm
Excerpt: 

Philip Glass turned 75 last month and celebrated in style with birthday concerts at (Le) Poisson Rouge and Carnegie Hall. There's much more to come this weekend with the Tune-In Music Festival's Celebrating the American Icon: Philip Glass at 75, a four-day event comprising five programs at NYC's Park Avenue Armory, featuring Glass’s own music, including his landmark piece Music in Twelve Parts, as well as music, poetry, and art created and performed by those who influenced him and those whom he has influenced throughout his career.

Copy: 

Composer Philip Glass turned 75 last month and celebrated in style with a birthday concert at (Le) Poisson Rouge and the US premiere of his Ninth Symphony at Carnegie Hall. The birthday celebrations continue this weekend with the Tune-In Music Festival's Celebrating the American Icon: Philip Glass at 75, a four-day event comprising five programs at the Park Avenue Armory in New York City, featuring Glass’s own music, including his landmark piece Music in Twelve Parts, as well as music, poetry, and art created and performed by those who influenced him and those whom he has influenced throughout his career.

The festival kicks off tonight a world premiere from Bill Frisell, in which the guitarist will be joined by an eight-piece ensemble in accompanying a reading of poet Allen Ginsberg's Kaddish by Ginsberg collaborator Hal Willner and artist Ralph Steadman, who will create the visual design and staging to accompany the piece.

On Friday night, Philip Glass will be joined by longtime collaborator Patti Smith for the sold-out event The Poet Speaks: music performances and readings celebrating their favorite poets, including Ginsberg and William Blake. This marks the first New York performance for the pair.

Saturday promises another unforgettable, sold-out event when the Philip Glass Ensemble offers a rare performance of the entire Music in Twelve Parts (1971-74), an epic piece that Glass considers to be the culmination of his minimalist period. New York Times music writer Allan Kozinn calls it "the crowning work" of what may be his "most original and revolutionary" period. "Along with Terry Riley’s In C (1964) and Steve Reich’s Drumming (1971)," Kozinn writes, "it captures the energy and spirit of early Minimalism and is one of the canon’s defining essays." The piece runs a total of five hours, including two short intermissions and one hour-long dinner break.

The Tune-In Music Festival's Philip Glass celebration concludes on Sunday with two events: an afternoon concert showcasing a number of artists assembled by Glass, including composer Nico Muhly with violist Nadia Sirota, the trio Tirtha, composer-pianist Tania Leon, and singer-songwriter Zack Glass; and an evening culminating concert featuring Glass’s Another Look at Harmony, a choral work he started in 1975 for organ and 100 voices, performed by the Brooklyn Youth Chorus, the Collegiate Chorale, and organist Michael Riesman, music director and keyboardist of the Philip Glass Ensemble.

For more on the Tune-In Music Festival's Celebrating the American Icon: Philip Glass at 75, head to armoryonpark.org.

Publish date: 
Thursday, February 23, 2012 - 10:30
Article Type: 
featuredimage: 
Philip Glass, "Music in Twelve Parts" [cover]

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