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Watch: Natalie Merchant’s “SHELTER” Concert Film Inspired by One Billion Rising

  • Tuesday, February 11, 2014
    Watch: Natalie Merchant’s “SHELTER” Concert Film Inspired by One Billion Rising

    Musician-activist Natalie Merchant has directed a short documentary film titled SHELTER: A Concert Film to Benefit Victims of Domestic Violence, that shines light on a group of women living in the Mid-Hudson region of New York State responding to the crisis of domestic violence in their community with compassion and creativity. Musicians, advocates, criminal prosecutors, victims and survivors all take to the stage, illuminating the darkness surrounding this public health epidemic. Watch the film below.

    Shelter was inspired by an event for One Billion Rising, a global campaign calling for an end to violence against women, held on February 14, 2013. Merchant will present a screening of this film this Friday, February 14, at the Old Dutch Church in Kingston, New York, on the day of One Billion Rising for Justice. 

    Natalie Merchant said of the film:

    "Last year, I attended a local One Billion Rising event near my home in the Hudson Valley. Upon entering, I was confronted by life-sized cardboard female figures, each with a name of a woman, the town where she had lived and the date on which she was murdered by her intimate partner. Fourteen women killed in ten years. One of the victims had been a neighbor of mine but I had not been aware of her death. My blood chilled. How could be a member of this community in good standing and not respond to this outrage. As the day progressed, I met directors of local shelters, prosecutors, police officers and survivors. I began to envision a follow-up event in which all these phenomenal advocates could be recognized for their work. I wanted to help them present to a larger audience this little understood and rarely discussed public health crisis in our region, in our world that is domestic violence."

    Watch the film here:

     

on February 11, 2014 - 12:38pm
Excerpt: 

Musician-activist Natalie Merchant has directed a short documentary film titled SHELTER: A Concert Film to Benefit Victims of Domestic Violence that shines light on a group of women living in the Mid-Hudson region of New York State responding to the crisis of domestic violence in their community with compassion and creativity. Musicians, advocates, criminal prosecutors, victims and survivors all take to the stage, illuminating the darkness surrounding this public health epidemic. Shelter was inspired by One Billion Rising, a global campaign calling for an end to violence against women. Watch the film here.

Copy: 

Musician-activist Natalie Merchant has directed a short documentary film titled SHELTER: A Concert Film to Benefit Victims of Domestic Violence, that shines light on a group of women living in the Mid-Hudson region of New York State responding to the crisis of domestic violence in their community with compassion and creativity. Musicians, advocates, criminal prosecutors, victims and survivors all take to the stage, illuminating the darkness surrounding this public health epidemic. Watch the film below.

Shelter was inspired by an event for One Billion Rising, a global campaign calling for an end to violence against women, held on February 14, 2013. Merchant will present a screening of this film this Friday, February 14, at the Old Dutch Church in Kingston, New York, on the day of One Billion Rising for Justice. 

Natalie Merchant said of the film:

"Last year, I attended a local One Billion Rising event near my home in the Hudson Valley. Upon entering, I was confronted by life-sized cardboard female figures, each with a name of a woman, the town where she had lived and the date on which she was murdered by her intimate partner. Fourteen women killed in ten years. One of the victims had been a neighbor of mine but I had not been aware of her death. My blood chilled. How could be a member of this community in good standing and not respond to this outrage. As the day progressed, I met directors of local shelters, prosecutors, police officers and survivors. I began to envision a follow-up event in which all these phenomenal advocates could be recognized for their work. I wanted to help them present to a larger audience this little understood and rarely discussed public health crisis in our region, in our world that is domestic violence."

Watch the film here:

 

Publish date: 
Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 09:00
Article Type: 
featuredimage: 
Natalie Merchant 2010 sq (Mark Seliger)

Comments

I escaped with my 3 sons from our abuser many years ago. One of my guardian angels, Irene, picked us up and we left with the chlothes on our backs and a bottle for my baby. We had to leave quickly for fear he would come home.
We stayed in safe homes for a few nights since there was no room at the Grace Smith House in Poughkeepsie. It was Halloween. This couple took us in and carved pumpkins with my boys. I was in shock. I was so scared and cold that I pulled a rug up off of the floor to keep me warm. More angels.
Then we went to the Grace Smith House. They kept us together in a room with bunk beds. Marylou, Elisabeth, and the many others who helped my boys feel safe, who took us to social services, to a lawyer. More angels.
The house was full of women and children. Karin, Linda, Rose to name a few. We drove each other to places, we talked and cried together. We helped with each others kids. One womens husband was a cop, another women wealthy. Another carried her sick daughter on her back to school each morning. More angels.
We were there for 3 months until we got an apartment.
I went to college. I got my Masters in Social Work. I worked 3 jobs. I worked at VBH. The social workers/nurses helped many abused women. More angels
WE MADE IT. WE ARE ALIVE.
Thanks to all the ANGELS that we met along the way.

My journey to leave my husband took many years before the final move. My sister Renee and her husband, Howie, drove all the way to Indiana to pick us up. Even after I went back to my abuser, she believed in me. My sisters Elizabeth, Diane and Denise never gave up on me either and supported us in many ways over the years. My friend, Ginger, stood by me for many years, too.
My professors and DCC helped in ways they never even knew. Marjorie Smith, Thank you for all you do for all of us.
More angels. Thank you.

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