Magic Potion

Submitted by nonesuch on Thu, 05/29/2008 - 19:14
Release Date
DescriptionExcerpt

"The group sounds as wonderfully debauched, degenerate, and dejected as ever," says E! of The Black Keys’ 2006 Nonesuch debut, Magic Potion, which the Detroit Free-Press called "hot, torn-asunder blues" and Paste magazine called "the band’s best yet."

Description

“Rare as it is to come across a band in its prime, at the flaming maximum of its powers, there's no mistaking it when it happens: A sense of inevitability, of necessity even, converges with a sense of surprise, and a fierce, ancient gladness. Wednesday night at Avalon, Ohio's Black Keys reminded a packed house what it means to be on.” —Boston Globe

The Black Keys' Nonesuch debut, Magic Potion, was released in September 2006 on CD and on vinyl. 

Childhood friends Dan Auerbach (guitar/vocals) and drummer Patrick Carney (drums) were mowing lawns in Akron when they made their first, self-released, record, 2002’s The Big Come Up; they embarked on their first tour that year, after being fired from their day jobs. Following enthusiastic responses from audiences and critics, the two men decided to remain unemployed so they could devote all of their time to their music. They practiced and toured relentlessly, then released their second album, Thickfreakness (their first on Fat Possum), in 2003. Later that year, they moved into an abandoned tire factory and set up their own rehearsal and recording studio, where they made 2004’s highly praised Rubber Factory—named for their unique space. Entertainment Weekly called Rubber Factory one of the best albums of the year, saying of The Black Keys, “They revive the notion that rock & roll should be murky and mysterious, a stumble into a dark alley late at night,” while The New Yorker said, “Direct, consistent, powerful, and loud, the record is one of the best rock releases of the year.” (The band’s final Fat Possum record, an EP of Junior Kimbrough covers called Chulahoma, was released this spring.)

The Black Keys live shows are fast becoming legendary among fans and critics alike. The Washington Post described the sound at a recent DC show as, “A giant crashing that is louder and fuller and grimmer than a drummer and guitarist alone should be able to produce,” and went on to say that “Auerbach is a ferociously talented guitarist whose leads bristle and burn as if the guitar were a molten mass. And Carney wails on his drums as if he were taking part in an anger management therapy exercise. The pair’s concert is as much a show of force as it is a musical performance.”

ProductionCredits

PRODUCTION CREDITS
Produced and recorded by The Black Keys at The Audio Eagle Nest, Akron, OH
Mastered at Magnetic North by Chris Keffer

All songs written by The Black Keys, McMoore McLesst Publishing (BMI), administered by Chrysalis Music

Artwork and design by Michael Carney

Nonesuch Selection Number

79967

Number of Discs in Set
1disc
FormatRestrictions

This album is available from Nonesuch in the United States and Canada only.

ns_album_artistid
229
ns_album_id
621
ns_album_releasedate
ns_genre_1
0
ns_genre_2
0
Album Status
Artist Name
The Black Keys
MusicianDetails

MUSICIANS
The Black Keys are Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney

Cover Art
UPC/Price
Label
CD+MP3
UPC
075597996722BUN
Label
MP3
Price
9.00
UPC
075597996760
Label
LP+MP3
Price
16.00
UPC
075597996715BUN
  • 79967

News & Reviews

  • Congratulations to all of the Nonesuch nominees for the 65th Grammy Awards: Molly Tuttle for Best New Artist and Best Bluegrass Album for Crooked Tree with Golden Highway; The Black Keys for Best Rock Album for Dropout Boogie and Best Rock Performance for "Wild Child"; Dan Auerbach for Producer of the Year, Non-Classical; Cécile McLorin Salvant for Best Jazz Vocal Album for Ghost Song and Best Arrangement, Instrumental and Vocals for "Optimistic Voices / No Love Dying"; Joshua Redman, Brad Mehldau, Christian McBride, and Brian Blade's LongGone for Best Instrumental Album; Brad Mehldau's Jacob's Ladder for Best Contemporary Instrumental Album; Punch Brothers' Hell on Church Street for Best Folk Album; Caroline Shaw & Attacca Quartet's Evergreen for Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance; Taj Mahal & Ry Cooder's GET ON BOARD for Best Traditional Blues Album; Wilco's Yankee Hotel Foxtrot (20th Anniversary Super Deluxe Edition) for Best Historical Album and Best Album Notes for Bob Mehr; and Astor Piazzolla: The American Clavé Recordings. for Best Album Notes for Fernando González. 

  • The Black Keys stopped by The Kelly Clarkson Show to perform “It Ain’t Over,” from their album Dropout Boogie. You can watch it here. The band has been nominated for two Grammy Awards: Best Rock Album for Dropout Boogie and Best Rock Performance for the album track "Wild Child.” Dan Auerbach is up for Producer of the Year, Non-Classical. 

Buy Now

  • About This Album

    “Rare as it is to come across a band in its prime, at the flaming maximum of its powers, there's no mistaking it when it happens: A sense of inevitability, of necessity even, converges with a sense of surprise, and a fierce, ancient gladness. Wednesday night at Avalon, Ohio's Black Keys reminded a packed house what it means to be on.” —Boston Globe

    The Black Keys' Nonesuch debut, Magic Potion, was released in September 2006 on CD and on vinyl. 

    Childhood friends Dan Auerbach (guitar/vocals) and drummer Patrick Carney (drums) were mowing lawns in Akron when they made their first, self-released, record, 2002’s The Big Come Up; they embarked on their first tour that year, after being fired from their day jobs. Following enthusiastic responses from audiences and critics, the two men decided to remain unemployed so they could devote all of their time to their music. They practiced and toured relentlessly, then released their second album, Thickfreakness (their first on Fat Possum), in 2003. Later that year, they moved into an abandoned tire factory and set up their own rehearsal and recording studio, where they made 2004’s highly praised Rubber Factory—named for their unique space. Entertainment Weekly called Rubber Factory one of the best albums of the year, saying of The Black Keys, “They revive the notion that rock & roll should be murky and mysterious, a stumble into a dark alley late at night,” while The New Yorker said, “Direct, consistent, powerful, and loud, the record is one of the best rock releases of the year.” (The band’s final Fat Possum record, an EP of Junior Kimbrough covers called Chulahoma, was released this spring.)

    The Black Keys live shows are fast becoming legendary among fans and critics alike. The Washington Post described the sound at a recent DC show as, “A giant crashing that is louder and fuller and grimmer than a drummer and guitarist alone should be able to produce,” and went on to say that “Auerbach is a ferociously talented guitarist whose leads bristle and burn as if the guitar were a molten mass. And Carney wails on his drums as if he were taking part in an anger management therapy exercise. The pair’s concert is as much a show of force as it is a musical performance.”

    Credits

    MUSICIANS
    The Black Keys are Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney

    PRODUCTION CREDITS
    Produced and recorded by The Black Keys at The Audio Eagle Nest, Akron, OH
    Mastered at Magnetic North by Chris Keffer

    All songs written by The Black Keys, McMoore McLesst Publishing (BMI), administered by Chrysalis Music

    Artwork and design by Michael Carney

  • Format Availability

    This album is available from Nonesuch in the United States and Canada only.