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Track listing

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1-01 Music for 18 Musicians: Pulses 5:26
1-02 Music for 18 Musicians: Section I 3:58
1-03 Music for 18 Musicians: Section II 5:13
1-04 Music for 18 Musicians: Section IIIA 3:55
1-05 Music for 18 Musicians: Section IIIB 3:46
1-06 Music for 18 Musicians: Section IV 6:37
1-07 Music for 18 Musicians: Section V 6:49
1-08 Music for 18 Musicians: Section VI 4:54
1-09 Music for 18 Musicians 4:19
1-10 Music for 18 Musicians: Section VIII 3:35
1-11 Music for 18 Musicians: 5:24
1-12 Music for 18 Musicians: Section X 1:51
1-13 Music for 18 Musicians: Section XI 5:44
1-14 Music for 18 Musicians: Pulses 6:11
2-01 Different Trains: America—Before the War 8:59
2-04 Tehillim: Part I (Fast) 11:46
2-08 Eight Lines (Octet) 17:29
1-03 Tehillim: Part III (Slow) 6:19
2-05 Tehillim: Part II (Fast) 5:54
2-02 Different Trains: Europe—During the War 7:31
2-03 Different Trains: After the War 10:20
2-06 Tehillim: Part III (Slow) 6:19
2-07 Tehillim: Part IV (Fast) 6:21
3-01 You Are (Variations): You are wherever your thoughts are 13:14
3-09 Electric Counterpoint: I. Fast 6:51
3-08 Cello Counterpoint 11:31
3-02 You Are (Variations): Shiviti Hashem L'negdi (I place the Eternal before me) 4:15
3-03 You Are (Variations): Explanations come to an end somewhere 5:24
3-04 You Are (Variations): Ehmor m aht, v ahsay harbay (Say little and do much) 4:04
3-05 New York Counterpoint: Fast 5:03
3-06 New York Counterpoint: Slow 2:44
3-07 New York Counterpoint: Fast 3:52
3-10 Electric Counterpoint: II. Slow 3:21
3-11 Electric Counterpoint: III. Fast 4:29
3-13 Triple Quartet: Second Movement 4:05
3-14 Triple Quartet: Third Movement 3:28
3-12 Triple Quartet: First Movement 7:10
4-01 Come Out 12:54
4-02 Proverb 14:04
4-03 The Desert Music: First Movement (Fast) 7:54
4-04 The Desert Music: Second Movement (Moderate) 6:59
4-05 The Desert Music: Third Movement, Part One (Slow) 6:59
4-06 The Desert Music: Third Movement, Part Two (Moderate) 5:54
4-07 The Desert Music: Third Movement, Part Three (Slow) 5:55
4-08 The Desert Music: Fourth Movement (Moderate) 3:35
4-09 The Desert Music: Fifth Movement (Fast) 10:46
5-01 Music for Mallet Instruments, Voices, and Organ 16:50
5-02 Drumming: Part I 17:30
5-03 Drumming: Part II 18:12
5-04 Drumming: Part III 11:13
5-05 Drumming: Part IV 9:47

Phases (5-CD Set)

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  • about this album

    “There’s just a handful of living composers who can legitimately claim to have altered the direction of musical history, and Steve Reich is one of them.” —The Guardian [UK]

    Nonesuch Records, Steve Reich’s label since 1985, released its second box set of his works, Phases: A Nonesuch Retrospective, in September 2006, in honor of his 70th birthday—timed to coincide with the New York City–wide celebration Steve Reich@70. Included in the five-CD collection are 14 of the revolutionary composer’s best known and most acclaimed pieces, including: Music for 18 Musicians, Different Trains, Tehillim, Eight Lines, You Are (Variations), Electric Counterpoint, Come Out, The Desert Music, and Drumming. The music on the discs, selected from previous Nonesuch records, spans the 20 years of Reich’s time on Nonesuch: The Desert Music was released in 1985, and You Are (Variations) was released in 2005.

    Reich, who recently was called “America’s greatest living composer” by The Village Voice, was born in 1936 in New York City. Fittingly, his 70th birthday was celebrated by three of his hometown’s leading performing arts organizations—BAM, Carnegie Hall, and Lincoln Center—in a celebration entitled Steve Reich@70. For the first time, these three institutions joined forces to pay tribute to a living composer, presenting complementary programs of his work. Each organization hosted a premiere of a new Reich work, along with a wide variety of earlier pieces, including collaborations with creators in other media. The month-long celebration began on the composer’s actual 70th birthday—October 3, 2006—and continued through November 4, with additional domestic and international observances of the anniversary continuing through the first months of 2007. “I never thought I’d look forward to turning 70,” said Steve Reich. “To say I’m honored is definitely an understatement.”

    BAM opened Steve Reich@70 with a dance program on Tuesday, October 3, in recognition of Reich’s status as one of today’s most choreographed composers. The Akram Khan Company, accompanied by the London Sinfonietta led by Alan Pierson, gave the US premiere of a new dance by British choreographer Khan, titled Variations for Vibes, Pianos, and Strings after Reich’s newly commissioned score. Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker, a choreographer long associated with the composer’s music, performed her classic work Fase, four movements to the music of Steve Reich, on October 3 and 5–7.

    This was followed at Carnegie Hall with a focus on Reich’s instrumental music. A seven-day Professional Training Workshop, led by the composer culminated in a concert by the participants on in Zankel Hall, with City Life and other works. In Stern Auditorium, Carnegie Hall presented a program of Reich’s masterworks performed by the artists for whom they were written: Electric Counterpoint, played by guitarist Pat Metheny; Different Trains, with the Kronos Quartet; and Music for 18 Musicians, performed by Steve Reich and Musicians. Carnegie Hall brought its portion of the festival to a close with a day-long exploration of Reich’s music, which includeed Discovery Day: Steve Reich—an afternoon of lecture, discussion, film, and participatory music-making in Weill Recital Hall—followed by a Making Music: Steve Reich concert that evening in Zankel Hall. The all-Reich program in Zankel included the US premiere of Daniel Variations, a tribute to the murdered Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl, co-commissioned by The Carnegie Hall Corporation.

    Lincoln Center concluded the month of music with an emphasis on Reich’s vocal and dramatic works. In Alice Tully Hall, Grant Gershon conducted the Los Angeles Master Chorale in the New York premiere of You Are (Variations) for voices and chamber ensemble, paired with Reich’s timeless Tehillim. Brad Lubman led the Steve Reich Ensemble in The Cave, Reich’s groundbreaking video opera collaboration with video artist Beryl Korot. This evening-length work had last been seen at the Lincoln Center Festival in 1999.

    This CD box set is available for sale in the Nonesuch Store; however, free, instant album MP3 downloads, included with other discs in the Store, are not currently available with box sets.

    Credits

    MUSICIANS
    DISC ONE
    Music for 18 Musicians
    Steve Reich and Musicians: Rebecca Armstrong, Marion Beckenstein, Cheryl Bensman Rowe, sopranos; Jay Clayton, alto, piano; Russell Hartenberger, Bob Becker, Tim Ferchen, marimbas, xylophones; James Preiss, vibraphone, piano; Garry Kvistad, marimba, xylophone, piano; Steve Reich, marimba, piano; Thad Wheeler, marimba, maracas; Nurit Tilles, Edmund Niemann, pianos
    Philip Bush, piano, maracas; Elizabeth Lim, violin; Jeanne LeBlanc, cello; Leslie Scott, Evan Ziporyn, clarinets, bass clarinets

    DISC TWO
    Different Trains
    Kronos Quartet: David Harrington, violin; John Sherba, violin; Hank Dutt, viola; Joan Jeanrenaud, cello

    Tehillim
    Schönberg Ensemble with Percussion Group The Hague
    Reinbert de Leeuw, conductor
    Barbara Borden, Tannie Willemstijn, sopranos; Yvonne Benschop, Ananda Goud, mezzo-sopranos

    Eight Lines
    Bang on a Can
    Bradley Lubman, conductor
    Todd Reynolds, Gregor Kitzis, Jaqueline Carrasco, Elizabeth Knowles, violins; Martha Mook, Ron Lawrence, violas; Mark Stewart, Greg Passelink, cellos; Patti Monson, David Fedele, flutes, piccolos; Michael Lowenstern, Evan Ziporyn, clarinets, bass clarinets; Edmund Niemann, Nurit Tilles, pianos

    DISC THREE
    You Are (Variations)
    Los Angeles Master Chorale
    Grant Gershon, conductor
    Phoebe Alexander, Tania Batson, Claire Fedoruk, Rachelle Fox, Marie Hodgson, Emily Lin, sopranos; Sarona Farrell, Amy Fogerson, Alice Murray, Nancy Sulahian, Kim Switzer, Tracy Van Fleet, altos; Pablo Corá, Shawn Kirchner, Joseph Golightly, Sean McDermott, Fletcher Sheridan, Kevin St. Clair, tenors
    Geri Ratella, Sara Weisz, flutes; Joan Elardo, Joel Timm, oboes; James Faschia, Helen Goode-Castro, Larry Hughes, clarinets; Gloria Cheng, Lisa Edwards, Brian Pezzone, Vicki Ray, pianos; Wade Culbreath, Mike Englander, John Magnussen, Tom Raney, marimbas, vibes; Tamara Hatwan, Ralph Morrison, Susan Reddish, violin 1; Samuel Fischer, Julie Rogers, Steve Scharf, violin 2; Darren McCann, Victoria Miskolcsky, Catherine Reddish, violas; Delores Bing, Maurice Grants, Roger LeBow, cellos; Oscar Hidalgo, bass

    New York Counterpoint
    Evan Ziporyn, clarinets

    Cello Counterpoint
    Maya Beiser, cello

    Electric Counterpoint

    Pat Metheny, guitar

    Triple Quartet
    Kronos Quartet: David Harrington, violin; John Sherba, violin; Hank Dutt, viola; Jennifer Culp, cello

    DISC FOUR
    Proverb

    Theatre of Voices: Andrea Fullington, Sonja Rasmussen, Allison Zelles, sopranos; Alan Bennett, Paul Elliott, tenors
    with members of The Steve Reich Ensemble: Russell Hartenberger, Bob Becker, vibraphones; Nurit Tilles, Edmund Niemann, electric organs
    Paul Hillier, conductor

    The Desert Music
    Steve Reich and Musicians
    with Members of the Brooklyn Philharmonic and Chorus
    Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor
    Principal Percussion: Russell Hartenberger, Bob Becker, Glen Velez, Garry Kvistad
    Principal Strings: Julie Rosenfeld, concertmistress; Deborah Redding, second violin; Francesca Martin, viola; Sharon Prater, cello; Donald Palma, bass
    Choral Contractor: Cheryl Bensman, soprano

    DISC FIVE
    Music for Mallet Instruments, Voices, and Organ
    Steve Reich and Musicians: Bob Becker, Tim Ferchen, Russell Hartenberger, Steve Reich, marimbas; Garry Kvistad, Thad Wheeler, glockenspiels; James Preiss, vibraphone; Nurit Tilles, electric organ; Pamela Wood Ambush, Rebecca Armstrong, voices (long tones); Jay Clayton, voice (melodic patterns)

    Drumming
    Steve Reich and Musicians: Bob Becker, Ben Harms, Russell Hartenberger, Garry Kvistad, James Preiss, Steve Reich, Gary Schall, Glen Velez, Thad Wheeler, tuned drums, marimbas, glockenspiels; Pamela Wood Ambush, Jay Clayton, voices; Steve Reich, whistling; Mort Silver, piccolo

    PRODUCTION CREDITS
    DISC ONE
    Music for 18 Musicians
    Produced by Judith Sherman
    Recorded October 1996 at the Hit Factory, New York
    Engineered by John Kilgore
    Assistant engineers: Glen Marchese,    Chris Hilt
    Production assistants: Sidney    Chen, Jeanne Velonis
    Mixed November 1996 and January 1997 at the Hit Factory, New York
    Mix engineer: John Kilgore
    Assistant mix engineers: Tony Black, Greg Thompson
    Editing assistance: Jeanne Velonis

    DISC TWO

    Different Trains
    Produced by Judith Sherman
    Recorded August September 1988 at Russian Hill Recording, San Francisco, CA
    Engineered by Las Brockman
    Assistant engineer: Michael Ahearn
    Mix engineer: Rob Eaton
    Assistant mix engineer: Ban Fowler

    Tehillim
    Produced by Judith Sherman
    Recorded August 1993 at Wisseloord Studios, Hilversum, the Netherlands
    Engineered by Hans Bedecker
    Assistant engineer for additional recording at The Hit Factory, New York: Andy Grassi
    Edited and mixed by Judith Sherman and Steve Reich at SoundByte Productions, New York

    Eight Lines
    Produced by Judith Sherman
    Recorded June 1996 at the Hit Factory, New York
    Engineered by John Kilgore
    Assistant engineers: Greg Thompson, Kevin Stone
    Production assistant: Sidney Chen
    Mixed October 1996 at the Hit Factory, New York
    Assistant mix engineer: Tony Black
    Editing assistance: Jeanne Velonis

    DISC THREE
    You Are (Variations)
    Produced by Judith Sherman
    Recorded March 29 & 30, 2005, at Studio A, Capitol Studios, Hollywood, CA
    Engineered by John Kilgore
    Mixed by John Kilgore, Judith Sherman, and Steve Reich
    Pro Tools Engineer: Jimmy Hoyson
    Second Engineer: Bruce Monical
    Editing Assistance: Jeanne Velonis

    New York Counterpoint
    Produced by Judith Sherman
    Recorded January 1996 at the Hit Factory, New York
    Engineered by John Kilgore
    Assistant engineer: Tony Black
    Mixed October 1998 at the Hit Factory, New York
    Assistant mix engineer: Tony Black
    Editing assistance: Jeanne Velonis

    Cello Counterpoint
    Produced by Judith Sherman
    Recorded Sept 29 & 30, 2003, at John Kilgore Sound & Recording, New York, NY
    Engineered by Jan Folkson
    Mixed by John Kilgore
    Editing Assistance: Jeanne Velonis

    Electric Counterpoint
    Produced by Judith Sherman
    Recorded September October 1987 at Power Station, New York
    Engineered by: Rob Eaton
    Assistant engineer: Gary Solomon

    Triple Quartet
    Produced by Judy Sherman
    Recorded March and April 1999 and August 2000 at Skywalker Sound
    Engineered by John Kilgore
    Assistant Engineers: Bob Levy and Dann Thompson
    Mixed by Steve Reich, Judith Sherman, and John Kilgore at Masque Sound

    DISC FOUR
    Come Out
    Produced by Judith Sherman and Steve Reich

    Proverb
    Produced by Judith Sherman and Steve Reich
    Recorded June 1998 at the Hit Factory, New York
    Engineered by John Kilgore
    Assistant engineer: Greg Thompson
    Assistant mix engineer: Geraldo Lopez
    Editing assistants: Jeanne Velonis, Karl Heriem

    The Desert Music
    Produced by Rudolph Werner and Steve Reich
    Recorded October 1984 at RCA Studio A, New York
    Engineered by Paul Goodman
    Editing and mixing: Karl-August Naegler, Wolf-Dieter Karwatki, Rudolph Werner, John Newton, Steve Reich
    Text by William Carlos Williams

    DISC FIVE
    Music for Mallet Instruments, Voices, and Organ
    Produced by Judith Sherman
    Recorded November 1988 at CTS Studios, London
    Engineered by Dick Lemzey
    Edited and mixed by Judith Sherman and Steve Reich at New York Digital Recording, Inc., New York

    Drumming
    Produced by Judith Sherman and Steve Reich
    Recorded May 1987 at RCA Studio A, New York
    Engineered by Paul Goodman
    Mixing and editing by Judith Sherman, Steve Reich, Paul Zinman

    PHASES
    Design by John Gall
    Photograph of Steve Reich by Jeffrey Herman

    Executive Producer: Robert Hurwitz

on May 29, 2008 - 7:14pm
Release Date: 
Tuesday, September 26, 2006 (All day)
Cover Art: 
Nonesuch Selection Number: 

79962

Number of Discs in Set: 
5discs
92
642
Tuesday, September 26, 2006 (All day)
0
0
Artist Name: 
Steve Reich
genre: 
Album Status: 
UPC/Price: 
UPC: 
075597979480
Price: 
27.00
Label: 
MP3
UPC: 
075597996227
Price: 
30.00
Label: 
5-CD set
Description: 

“There’s just a handful of living composers who can legitimately claim to have altered the direction of musical history, and Steve Reich is one of them.” —The Guardian [UK]

Nonesuch Records, Steve Reich’s label since 1985, released its second box set of his works, Phases: A Nonesuch Retrospective, in September 2006, in honor of his 70th birthday—timed to coincide with the New York City–wide celebration Steve Reich@70. Included in the five-CD collection are 14 of the revolutionary composer’s best known and most acclaimed pieces, including: Music for 18 Musicians, Different Trains, Tehillim, Eight Lines, You Are (Variations), Electric Counterpoint, Come Out, The Desert Music, and Drumming. The music on the discs, selected from previous Nonesuch records, spans the 20 years of Reich’s time on Nonesuch: The Desert Music was released in 1985, and You Are (Variations) was released in 2005.

Reich, who recently was called “America’s greatest living composer” by The Village Voice, was born in 1936 in New York City. Fittingly, his 70th birthday was celebrated by three of his hometown’s leading performing arts organizations—BAM, Carnegie Hall, and Lincoln Center—in a celebration entitled Steve Reich@70. For the first time, these three institutions joined forces to pay tribute to a living composer, presenting complementary programs of his work. Each organization hosted a premiere of a new Reich work, along with a wide variety of earlier pieces, including collaborations with creators in other media. The month-long celebration began on the composer’s actual 70th birthday—October 3, 2006—and continued through November 4, with additional domestic and international observances of the anniversary continuing through the first months of 2007. “I never thought I’d look forward to turning 70,” said Steve Reich. “To say I’m honored is definitely an understatement.”

BAM opened Steve Reich@70 with a dance program on Tuesday, October 3, in recognition of Reich’s status as one of today’s most choreographed composers. The Akram Khan Company, accompanied by the London Sinfonietta led by Alan Pierson, gave the US premiere of a new dance by British choreographer Khan, titled Variations for Vibes, Pianos, and Strings after Reich’s newly commissioned score. Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker, a choreographer long associated with the composer’s music, performed her classic work Fase, four movements to the music of Steve Reich, on October 3 and 5–7.

This was followed at Carnegie Hall with a focus on Reich’s instrumental music. A seven-day Professional Training Workshop, led by the composer culminated in a concert by the participants on in Zankel Hall, with City Life and other works. In Stern Auditorium, Carnegie Hall presented a program of Reich’s masterworks performed by the artists for whom they were written: Electric Counterpoint, played by guitarist Pat Metheny; Different Trains, with the Kronos Quartet; and Music for 18 Musicians, performed by Steve Reich and Musicians. Carnegie Hall brought its portion of the festival to a close with a day-long exploration of Reich’s music, which includeed Discovery Day: Steve Reich—an afternoon of lecture, discussion, film, and participatory music-making in Weill Recital Hall—followed by a Making Music: Steve Reich concert that evening in Zankel Hall. The all-Reich program in Zankel included the US premiere of Daniel Variations, a tribute to the murdered Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl, co-commissioned by The Carnegie Hall Corporation.

Lincoln Center concluded the month of music with an emphasis on Reich’s vocal and dramatic works. In Alice Tully Hall, Grant Gershon conducted the Los Angeles Master Chorale in the New York premiere of You Are (Variations) for voices and chamber ensemble, paired with Reich’s timeless Tehillim. Brad Lubman led the Steve Reich Ensemble in The Cave, Reich’s groundbreaking video opera collaboration with video artist Beryl Korot. This evening-length work had last been seen at the Lincoln Center Festival in 1999.

This CD box set is available for sale in the Nonesuch Store; however, free, instant album MP3 downloads, included with other discs in the Store, are not currently available with box sets.

DescriptionExcerpt: 

Nonesuch Records, Steve Reich’s label since 1985, released its second box set of his works, Phases: A Nonesuch Retrospective, in 2006, in honor of his 70th birthday—timed to coincide with the New York City–wide celebration Steve Reich@70. Included in the five-CD collection are 14 of the revolutionary composer’s best known and most acclaimed pieces, spanning Reich's first 20 years on Nonesuch, including: Music for 18 Musicians, Different Trains, Tehillim, Eight Lines, You Are (Variations), Electric Counterpoint, Come Out, The Desert Music, and Drumming.

ProductionCredits: 

MUSICIANS
DISC ONE
Music for 18 Musicians
Steve Reich and Musicians: Rebecca Armstrong, Marion Beckenstein, Cheryl Bensman Rowe, sopranos; Jay Clayton, alto, piano; Russell Hartenberger, Bob Becker, Tim Ferchen, marimbas, xylophones; James Preiss, vibraphone, piano; Garry Kvistad, marimba, xylophone, piano; Steve Reich, marimba, piano; Thad Wheeler, marimba, maracas; Nurit Tilles, Edmund Niemann, pianos
Philip Bush, piano, maracas; Elizabeth Lim, violin; Jeanne LeBlanc, cello; Leslie Scott, Evan Ziporyn, clarinets, bass clarinets

DISC TWO
Different Trains
Kronos Quartet: David Harrington, violin; John Sherba, violin; Hank Dutt, viola; Joan Jeanrenaud, cello

Tehillim
Schönberg Ensemble with Percussion Group The Hague
Reinbert de Leeuw, conductor
Barbara Borden, Tannie Willemstijn, sopranos; Yvonne Benschop, Ananda Goud, mezzo-sopranos

Eight Lines
Bang on a Can
Bradley Lubman, conductor
Todd Reynolds, Gregor Kitzis, Jaqueline Carrasco, Elizabeth Knowles, violins; Martha Mook, Ron Lawrence, violas; Mark Stewart, Greg Passelink, cellos; Patti Monson, David Fedele, flutes, piccolos; Michael Lowenstern, Evan Ziporyn, clarinets, bass clarinets; Edmund Niemann, Nurit Tilles, pianos

DISC THREE
You Are (Variations)
Los Angeles Master Chorale
Grant Gershon, conductor
Phoebe Alexander, Tania Batson, Claire Fedoruk, Rachelle Fox, Marie Hodgson, Emily Lin, sopranos; Sarona Farrell, Amy Fogerson, Alice Murray, Nancy Sulahian, Kim Switzer, Tracy Van Fleet, altos; Pablo Corá, Shawn Kirchner, Joseph Golightly, Sean McDermott, Fletcher Sheridan, Kevin St. Clair, tenors
Geri Ratella, Sara Weisz, flutes; Joan Elardo, Joel Timm, oboes; James Faschia, Helen Goode-Castro, Larry Hughes, clarinets; Gloria Cheng, Lisa Edwards, Brian Pezzone, Vicki Ray, pianos; Wade Culbreath, Mike Englander, John Magnussen, Tom Raney, marimbas, vibes; Tamara Hatwan, Ralph Morrison, Susan Reddish, violin 1; Samuel Fischer, Julie Rogers, Steve Scharf, violin 2; Darren McCann, Victoria Miskolcsky, Catherine Reddish, violas; Delores Bing, Maurice Grants, Roger LeBow, cellos; Oscar Hidalgo, bass

New York Counterpoint
Evan Ziporyn, clarinets

Cello Counterpoint
Maya Beiser, cello

Electric Counterpoint

Pat Metheny, guitar

Triple Quartet
Kronos Quartet: David Harrington, violin; John Sherba, violin; Hank Dutt, viola; Jennifer Culp, cello

DISC FOUR
Proverb

Theatre of Voices: Andrea Fullington, Sonja Rasmussen, Allison Zelles, sopranos; Alan Bennett, Paul Elliott, tenors
with members of The Steve Reich Ensemble: Russell Hartenberger, Bob Becker, vibraphones; Nurit Tilles, Edmund Niemann, electric organs
Paul Hillier, conductor

The Desert Music
Steve Reich and Musicians
with Members of the Brooklyn Philharmonic and Chorus
Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor
Principal Percussion: Russell Hartenberger, Bob Becker, Glen Velez, Garry Kvistad
Principal Strings: Julie Rosenfeld, concertmistress; Deborah Redding, second violin; Francesca Martin, viola; Sharon Prater, cello; Donald Palma, bass
Choral Contractor: Cheryl Bensman, soprano

DISC FIVE
Music for Mallet Instruments, Voices, and Organ
Steve Reich and Musicians: Bob Becker, Tim Ferchen, Russell Hartenberger, Steve Reich, marimbas; Garry Kvistad, Thad Wheeler, glockenspiels; James Preiss, vibraphone; Nurit Tilles, electric organ; Pamela Wood Ambush, Rebecca Armstrong, voices (long tones); Jay Clayton, voice (melodic patterns)

Drumming
Steve Reich and Musicians: Bob Becker, Ben Harms, Russell Hartenberger, Garry Kvistad, James Preiss, Steve Reich, Gary Schall, Glen Velez, Thad Wheeler, tuned drums, marimbas, glockenspiels; Pamela Wood Ambush, Jay Clayton, voices; Steve Reich, whistling; Mort Silver, piccolo

PRODUCTION CREDITS
DISC ONE
Music for 18 Musicians
Produced by Judith Sherman
Recorded October 1996 at the Hit Factory, New York
Engineered by John Kilgore
Assistant engineers: Glen Marchese,    Chris Hilt
Production assistants: Sidney    Chen, Jeanne Velonis
Mixed November 1996 and January 1997 at the Hit Factory, New York
Mix engineer: John Kilgore
Assistant mix engineers: Tony Black, Greg Thompson
Editing assistance: Jeanne Velonis

DISC TWO

Different Trains
Produced by Judith Sherman
Recorded August September 1988 at Russian Hill Recording, San Francisco, CA
Engineered by Las Brockman
Assistant engineer: Michael Ahearn
Mix engineer: Rob Eaton
Assistant mix engineer: Ban Fowler

Tehillim
Produced by Judith Sherman
Recorded August 1993 at Wisseloord Studios, Hilversum, the Netherlands
Engineered by Hans Bedecker
Assistant engineer for additional recording at The Hit Factory, New York: Andy Grassi
Edited and mixed by Judith Sherman and Steve Reich at SoundByte Productions, New York

Eight Lines
Produced by Judith Sherman
Recorded June 1996 at the Hit Factory, New York
Engineered by John Kilgore
Assistant engineers: Greg Thompson, Kevin Stone
Production assistant: Sidney Chen
Mixed October 1996 at the Hit Factory, New York
Assistant mix engineer: Tony Black
Editing assistance: Jeanne Velonis

DISC THREE
You Are (Variations)
Produced by Judith Sherman
Recorded March 29 & 30, 2005, at Studio A, Capitol Studios, Hollywood, CA
Engineered by John Kilgore
Mixed by John Kilgore, Judith Sherman, and Steve Reich
Pro Tools Engineer: Jimmy Hoyson
Second Engineer: Bruce Monical
Editing Assistance: Jeanne Velonis

New York Counterpoint
Produced by Judith Sherman
Recorded January 1996 at the Hit Factory, New York
Engineered by John Kilgore
Assistant engineer: Tony Black
Mixed October 1998 at the Hit Factory, New York
Assistant mix engineer: Tony Black
Editing assistance: Jeanne Velonis

Cello Counterpoint
Produced by Judith Sherman
Recorded Sept 29 & 30, 2003, at John Kilgore Sound & Recording, New York, NY
Engineered by Jan Folkson
Mixed by John Kilgore
Editing Assistance: Jeanne Velonis

Electric Counterpoint
Produced by Judith Sherman
Recorded September October 1987 at Power Station, New York
Engineered by: Rob Eaton
Assistant engineer: Gary Solomon

Triple Quartet
Produced by Judy Sherman
Recorded March and April 1999 and August 2000 at Skywalker Sound
Engineered by John Kilgore
Assistant Engineers: Bob Levy and Dann Thompson
Mixed by Steve Reich, Judith Sherman, and John Kilgore at Masque Sound

DISC FOUR
Come Out
Produced by Judith Sherman and Steve Reich

Proverb
Produced by Judith Sherman and Steve Reich
Recorded June 1998 at the Hit Factory, New York
Engineered by John Kilgore
Assistant engineer: Greg Thompson
Assistant mix engineer: Geraldo Lopez
Editing assistants: Jeanne Velonis, Karl Heriem

The Desert Music
Produced by Rudolph Werner and Steve Reich
Recorded October 1984 at RCA Studio A, New York
Engineered by Paul Goodman
Editing and mixing: Karl-August Naegler, Wolf-Dieter Karwatki, Rudolph Werner, John Newton, Steve Reich
Text by William Carlos Williams

DISC FIVE
Music for Mallet Instruments, Voices, and Organ
Produced by Judith Sherman
Recorded November 1988 at CTS Studios, London
Engineered by Dick Lemzey
Edited and mixed by Judith Sherman and Steve Reich at New York Digital Recording, Inc., New York

Drumming
Produced by Judith Sherman and Steve Reich
Recorded May 1987 at RCA Studio A, New York
Engineered by Paul Goodman
Mixing and editing by Judith Sherman, Steve Reich, Paul Zinman

PHASES
Design by John Gall
Photograph of Steve Reich by Jeffrey Herman

Executive Producer: Robert Hurwitz