Bill Frisell, Ron Carter, Paul Motian

Submitted by nonesuch on Thu, 05/29/2008 - 19:14
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Release Date
DescriptionExcerpt

Guitarist/composer Bill Frisell convened in a Manhattan studio with two jazz greats, bassist Ron Carter and drummer Paul Motian. The New Yorker says, “The all-star threesome performs like a seasoned band, and Frisell remains the only six-string poet of his generation.”

Description

Grammy-winning guitarist, composer, and bandleader Bill Frisell teams up with two of his musical idols, bassist Ron Carter and drummer Paul Motian, on this album, produced by Lee Townsend and featuring original compositions from each musician along with songs by Thelonious Monk, Hank Williams, and others.

Frisell considers this album a major personal accomplishment. He says, “To hear Paul and Ron play together was a dream come true for me. I knew they had worked together a little bit in the 60’s and was sure they would reconnect in a big way.  During the sessions I was so mesmerized listening to them­—most of the time I wasn’t even aware that I was playing too! I wanted the album to be live, all of us playing in a room. It was recorded quickly, with no rehearsal.”

Speaking of Carter and Motian, Frisell says, “In high school I heard Wes Montgomery’s Bumpin’ on Sunset. This was the first ‘jazz’ solo I learned to play on the guitar. The floodgates were opened and soon I was listening to Miles, Eric Dolphy, Jim Hall, Kenny Burrell, Sonny Rollins, Herbie, Wayne, Tony, Sam Rivers, Freddie Hubbard, McCoy, etc. This music changed my life. Ron Carter is the thread that runs through all of it, since he played with all those guys. It’s awesome to think about.” He continues, “I first had the chance to meet and play with Ron on Joey Baron’s albums, Down Home and We'll Soon Find Out. He then invited me to play on his album Orfeu. We’ve done some gigs with Joey’s band and also some duo gigs at the Blue Note Club in New York.  He’s been so supportive of my music and me. I wrote a tune for him, ‘Ron Carter’ on my Blues Dream album. The bass line has only two notes.

“Paul Motian is my musical father. There’s no way to put into just a few words the impact he has had on me. He helped me find my musical voice. In 1968, I heard him play live for the first time with Charles Lloyd’s band. So, just as I was discovering Ron’s music I also found Paul’s with Bill Evans, Paul Bley, Lennie Tristano, etc. In 1981, Paul was looking for a guitar player and Pat Metheny recommended me. Paul called and invited me to come to his apartment and play with bassist Marc Johnson. Bill Evans had recently passed away and they were reminiscing about their time spent with him. The first song we played together that day was ‘My Man’s Gone Now.’ We’ve been playing together ever since.”

In a career that spans three decades and more than 100 recordings, Bill Frisell has been hailed by the New York Times as “the most significant and widely imitated guitarist to emerge in jazz since the beginning of the 1980s.” Frisell’s Nonesuch discography comprises more than 20 albums, primarily featuring his own compositions, and recently was cited by DownBeat as “the best recorded output of the decade.” Highlights include the live album, East/West; Unspeakable, a collaboration with Hal Willner and the 2005 Grammy Winner for Best Contemporary Jazz Album; the 2004 Grammy-nominated The Intercontinentals; Ghost Town; two CDs of original scores for Buster Keaton films; Nashville, which was recorded with colleagues including mandolinist Adam Steffey and banjo player Ron Block, dobro great Jerry Douglas, and bassist Viktor Krauss; a trio recording with Elvin Jones and Dave Holland; and collaborations featuring Jim Keltner, Greg Leisz, and Krauss (Gone, Just Like a Train and Good Dog, Happy Man). His recorded works also include covers of music by Charles Ives, Stephen Foster, and Bob Dylan, among others. Frisell recently performed on albums for Loudon Wainwright III, Paul Simon, and Lucinda Williams and worked with T Bone Burnett on the Johnny Cash Walk the Line film score.

ProductionCredits

PRODUCTION CREDITS
Produced by Lee Townsend
Recorded February 14–15, 2005, at Avatar Studios, New York, NY
Recorded and Mixed by James Farber
Assistant Engineer: Ross Peterson
Mixed at In the Pocket Studio, Forestville, CA
Assistant Engineer: John-Paul McLean
Mastered by Greg Calbi at Sterling Sound, New York, NY
Production Assistance: Adam Blomberg
Ron Carter appears courtesy of Toshiba-EMI.
Executive Producer: Robert Hurwitz

Design by John Gall
Cover photograph by Ralph Gibson

Nonesuch Selection Number

79897

Number of Discs in Set
1disc
ns_album_artistid
38
ns_album_id
637
ns_album_releasedate
ns_genre_1
0
ns_genre_2
0
Album Status
Artist Name
Bill Frisell
MusicianDetails

MUSICIANS
Bill Frisell, guitar
Ron Carter, bass
Paul Motian, drums

Cover Art
UPC/Price
Label
CD+MP3
UPC
075597989724BUN
Label
MP3
Price
9.00
UPC
075597989762
  • 79897

News & Reviews

  • Ahead of the long-awaited world premiere of Omar, the opera composed by Rhiannon Giddens and Michael Abels, at the Spoleto Festival USA in Charleston, SC, next Friday, Giddens has released her own recording of the song “Julie’s Aria” from the opera. The recording was made by Giddens with guitarist Bill Frisell and her frequent collaborator Francesco Turrisi. Omar is based on the life and autobiography of enslaved Muslim scholar Omar Ibn Said, who was forcefully brought to Charleston from Africa in 1807. “My work as a whole is about excavating and shining a light on pieces of history that not only need to be seen and heard," Giddens says, "but that can also add to the conversation about what’s going on now. This is a story that hasn’t been represented in the operatic world—or in any world.” Omar will also be performed by LA Opera, Lyric Opera of Chicago, Boston Lyric Opera, San Francisco Opera, and Carolina Performing Arts at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill.

  • Cornetist, composer, and educator Ron Miles died at his home in Denver, Colorado, on Tuesday, March 8, due to complications from polycythemia vera, a rare blood disorder, at the age 58. He can be heard on several Nonesuch recordings, performing with Joshua Redman on the 2018 Grammy-nominated album Still Dreaming and with Bill Frisell on History, Mystery (2008), Blues Dream (2001), and Quartet (1996).

Buy Now

  • About This Album

    Grammy-winning guitarist, composer, and bandleader Bill Frisell teams up with two of his musical idols, bassist Ron Carter and drummer Paul Motian, on this album, produced by Lee Townsend and featuring original compositions from each musician along with songs by Thelonious Monk, Hank Williams, and others.

    Frisell considers this album a major personal accomplishment. He says, “To hear Paul and Ron play together was a dream come true for me. I knew they had worked together a little bit in the 60’s and was sure they would reconnect in a big way.  During the sessions I was so mesmerized listening to them­—most of the time I wasn’t even aware that I was playing too! I wanted the album to be live, all of us playing in a room. It was recorded quickly, with no rehearsal.”

    Speaking of Carter and Motian, Frisell says, “In high school I heard Wes Montgomery’s Bumpin’ on Sunset. This was the first ‘jazz’ solo I learned to play on the guitar. The floodgates were opened and soon I was listening to Miles, Eric Dolphy, Jim Hall, Kenny Burrell, Sonny Rollins, Herbie, Wayne, Tony, Sam Rivers, Freddie Hubbard, McCoy, etc. This music changed my life. Ron Carter is the thread that runs through all of it, since he played with all those guys. It’s awesome to think about.” He continues, “I first had the chance to meet and play with Ron on Joey Baron’s albums, Down Home and We'll Soon Find Out. He then invited me to play on his album Orfeu. We’ve done some gigs with Joey’s band and also some duo gigs at the Blue Note Club in New York.  He’s been so supportive of my music and me. I wrote a tune for him, ‘Ron Carter’ on my Blues Dream album. The bass line has only two notes.

    “Paul Motian is my musical father. There’s no way to put into just a few words the impact he has had on me. He helped me find my musical voice. In 1968, I heard him play live for the first time with Charles Lloyd’s band. So, just as I was discovering Ron’s music I also found Paul’s with Bill Evans, Paul Bley, Lennie Tristano, etc. In 1981, Paul was looking for a guitar player and Pat Metheny recommended me. Paul called and invited me to come to his apartment and play with bassist Marc Johnson. Bill Evans had recently passed away and they were reminiscing about their time spent with him. The first song we played together that day was ‘My Man’s Gone Now.’ We’ve been playing together ever since.”

    In a career that spans three decades and more than 100 recordings, Bill Frisell has been hailed by the New York Times as “the most significant and widely imitated guitarist to emerge in jazz since the beginning of the 1980s.” Frisell’s Nonesuch discography comprises more than 20 albums, primarily featuring his own compositions, and recently was cited by DownBeat as “the best recorded output of the decade.” Highlights include the live album, East/West; Unspeakable, a collaboration with Hal Willner and the 2005 Grammy Winner for Best Contemporary Jazz Album; the 2004 Grammy-nominated The Intercontinentals; Ghost Town; two CDs of original scores for Buster Keaton films; Nashville, which was recorded with colleagues including mandolinist Adam Steffey and banjo player Ron Block, dobro great Jerry Douglas, and bassist Viktor Krauss; a trio recording with Elvin Jones and Dave Holland; and collaborations featuring Jim Keltner, Greg Leisz, and Krauss (Gone, Just Like a Train and Good Dog, Happy Man). His recorded works also include covers of music by Charles Ives, Stephen Foster, and Bob Dylan, among others. Frisell recently performed on albums for Loudon Wainwright III, Paul Simon, and Lucinda Williams and worked with T Bone Burnett on the Johnny Cash Walk the Line film score.

    Credits

    MUSICIANS
    Bill Frisell, guitar
    Ron Carter, bass
    Paul Motian, drums

    PRODUCTION CREDITS
    Produced by Lee Townsend
    Recorded February 14–15, 2005, at Avatar Studios, New York, NY
    Recorded and Mixed by James Farber
    Assistant Engineer: Ross Peterson
    Mixed at In the Pocket Studio, Forestville, CA
    Assistant Engineer: John-Paul McLean
    Mastered by Greg Calbi at Sterling Sound, New York, NY
    Production Assistance: Adam Blomberg
    Ron Carter appears courtesy of Toshiba-EMI.
    Executive Producer: Robert Hurwitz

    Design by John Gall
    Cover photograph by Ralph Gibson

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