Listen: Stephin Merritt on BBC World Service’s ‘Music Life’

Browse by:
Year
Browse by:
Publish date (field_publish_date)
Submitted by nonesuch on
Article Type
Publish date
Excerpt

The Magnetic Fields’ Stephin Merritt is on BBC World Service’s Music Life with Beirut's Zach Condon and Blondie's Debbie Harry and Chris Stein. They discuss artistic self-expression, the influence of location on songwriting, and what unexpected musical genres have inspired them. You can hear it here. The Magnetic Fields, who just completed a European tour, will tour the US with songs from 69 Love Songs next year for the album's 25th anniversary. Their 2004 Nonesuch debut album, i, was released on vinyl for the first time this past spring.

Copy

The Magnetic FieldsStephin Merritt is on the latest episode of BBC World Service’s Music Life along with Beirut's Zach Condon and Blondie's Debbie Harry and Chris Stein. They discuss artistic self-expression, the influence of location on songwriting, and what unexpected musical genres have inspired them. You can hear their conversation via Spotify and Apple Music here:

The Magnetic Fields have just completed a fifteen-concert European tour, with shows in Spain, France, Belgium, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Türkiye, Greece, and Austria. They will tour the US with songs from 69 Love Songs next year in celebration of the album's 25th anniversary, with multiple shows in North Adams, Boston, New York City, Chicago, Los Angeles, and San Francisco; you can find details and get tickets here. The Magnetic Fields' 2004 Nonesuch debut album, i, was released on vinyl for the first time in a limited-edition, gold-colored LP this past spring; you can get it here.

featuredimage
Stephin Merritt: BBC World Service's 'Music Life,' December 2024
  • Monday, December 4, 2023
    Listen: Stephin Merritt on BBC World Service’s ‘Music Life’
    BBC World Service

    The Magnetic FieldsStephin Merritt is on the latest episode of BBC World Service’s Music Life along with Beirut's Zach Condon and Blondie's Debbie Harry and Chris Stein. They discuss artistic self-expression, the influence of location on songwriting, and what unexpected musical genres have inspired them. You can hear their conversation via Spotify and Apple Music here:

    The Magnetic Fields have just completed a fifteen-concert European tour, with shows in Spain, France, Belgium, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Türkiye, Greece, and Austria. They will tour the US with songs from 69 Love Songs next year in celebration of the album's 25th anniversary, with multiple shows in North Adams, Boston, New York City, Chicago, Los Angeles, and San Francisco; you can find details and get tickets here. The Magnetic Fields' 2004 Nonesuch debut album, i, was released on vinyl for the first time in a limited-edition, gold-colored LP this past spring; you can get it here.

    Journal Articles:PodcastRadio

Enjoy This Post?

Get weekly updates right in your inbox.
terms

X By submitting my information, I agree to receive personalized updates and marketing messages about Nonesuch based on my information, interests, activities, website visits and device data and in accordance with the Privacy Policy. I understand that I can opt-out at any time by emailing privacypolicy@wmg.com.

Thank you!
x

Welcome to Nonesuch's mailing list!

Customize your notifications for tour dates near your hometown, birthday wishes, or special discounts in our online store!
terms

By submitting my information, I agree to receive personalized updates and marketing messages about Nonesuch based on my information, interests, activities, website visits and device data and in accordance with the Privacy Policy. I understand that I can opt-out at any time by emailing privacypolicy@wmg.com.

Related Posts

  • Tuesday, June 11, 2024
    Tuesday, June 11, 2024

    The Staves have released a new video podcast episode in which band mates and sisters Jessica and Camilla Stavely-Taylor chat about all things All Now, their new album. "I think wanting things to be really good can make you very afraid to try, because you're worried about failing, about falling short of that, which is such a trap—it keeps you kind of frozen," Camilla says. "Ultimately it doesn't matter, you have to just do things, keep those muscles moving, making things and being imperfect and imperfections are what life is about. That's human." You can watch their conversation here.

    Journal Topics: Artist NewsPodcastVideo
  • Friday, May 31, 2024
    Friday, May 31, 2024

    "For every music lover, I think there are two basic forms of pleasure: the huge satisfaction of something you love done just perfectly, and then the thrill of hearing something altogether shockingly new. When an artist does both things at once, your head comes open a little bit, which is what happened when I first heard Cécile McLorin Salvant," David Remnick, the editor of The New Yorker, says of his guest on The New Yorker Radio Hour. "She's a jazz singer for sure, someone on the level of Sarah Vaughan or Ella Fitzgerald, but her repertoire and her approach to performing are totally her own." Salvant spoke with Remnick and performed three songs with pianist Sullivan Fortner: the Funny Girl favorite "Don't Rain on My Parade," the late 16th-century John Dowland song “Can She Excuse My Wrongs," and her own “Moon Song,” from her 2022 Nonesuch debut album, Ghost Song. You can hear it all (including a shoutout to Rhiannon Giddens) here.

    Journal Topics: Artist NewsPodcastRadio