Skip directly to content
Browse by:
  • Tuesday, October 5, 2021
    Pitchfork Lists 'The 200 Most Important Artists of Pitchfork’s First 25 Years'

    Pitchfork, in celebration of its 25th anniversary, has published a list of 'The 200 Most Important Artists of Pitchfork’s First 25 Years.' The list includes five artists familiar to readers of the Nonesuch Journal over the years as well: Wilco, The Magnetic Fields, Conor Oberst, Fleet Foxes, and Björk.

    "Year in and year out the stolid Midwesterners do the work," Pitchfork says of Wilco and the importance of the "dignified longevity" it's achieved, "showing us that pomp and flash and shiny new things all have their place, but it’s survival that matters most of all." In a separate post, in a re-scoring of 19 album review scores, Wilco's 2007 Nonesuch album, Sky Blue Sky, is raised from 5.2 to 8.5, with Sam Sodomsky calling it "an essential album" (and proving prophetic the album track "Please Be Patient With Me").

    "The Magnetic Fields redefined, if not single-handedly invented, dead-pan indie pop," says Pitchfork, throughout the band's 30 year career, not least in 1999's 69 Love Songs and its 2017 Nonesuch album, 50 Song Memoir. The site cites Sam Sodomsky's review of the latter release, which notes Stephin Merritt's "growing mastery as a songwriter. It suggests that our deepest wisdom can be located in our most personal thoughts."

    "As he evolved from Omaha, Nebraska’s teenage emo wunderkind into one of America’s most respected songwriters, gracefully fulfilling the 'New Dylan' role that early critics placed on him," says Pitchfork, "Conor Oberst remained in constant motion ... His long career has set a benchmark for how to evolve while maintaining your integrity as an indie artist in the 21st century."

    Noting Fleet Foxes' evolution over the years to creating albums that were "more adventurous, confrontational, and graceful," Pitchfork cites a profile by Amanda Petrusich around the release of the band's 2017 Nonesuch album, Crack-Up: "[Robin] Pecknold is gentle and intelligent, a hungry listener; talking with him, you get the sense that an antenna is always up and open, collecting new and better information about the world."

    Björk, whose 2011 studio album Biophilia and 2009 live album Voltaic: Songs from the Volta Tour were released on Nonesuch in the US, "has united electronic innovation, audio-visual experiments, radical new performance modes, scientific investigation, and naked emotional expression in one dazzling catalog," says Pitchfork, "becoming one of the most uncompromising pop stars of our era in the process."

    You can read more on all of the above and see the complete list of the 'The 200 Most Important Artists of Pitchfork’s First 25 Years' at pitchfork.com.

    Journal Articles:Artist News

Enjoy This Post?

Share This Post

Pitchfork Lists 'The 200 Most Important Artists of Pitchfork’s First 25 Years'

Browse by:
nonesuch's picture
on October 5, 2021 - 10:00am
Article Type: 
Publish date: 
Tuesday, October 5, 2021 - 10:00
Excerpt: 

Pitchfork, in celebration of its 25th anniversary, has published a list of 'The 200 Most Important Artists of Pitchfork’s First 25 Years,' including Wilco, The Magnetic Fields, Conor Oberst, Fleet Foxes, and Björk.

Copy: 

Pitchfork, in celebration of its 25th anniversary, has published a list of 'The 200 Most Important Artists of Pitchfork’s First 25 Years.' The list includes five artists familiar to readers of the Nonesuch Journal over the years as well: Wilco, The Magnetic Fields, Conor Oberst, Fleet Foxes, and Björk.

"Year in and year out the stolid Midwesterners do the work," Pitchfork says of Wilco and the importance of the "dignified longevity" it's achieved, "showing us that pomp and flash and shiny new things all have their place, but it’s survival that matters most of all." In a separate post, in a re-scoring of 19 album review scores, Wilco's 2007 Nonesuch album, Sky Blue Sky, is raised from 5.2 to 8.5, with Sam Sodomsky calling it "an essential album" (and proving prophetic the album track "Please Be Patient With Me").

"The Magnetic Fields redefined, if not single-handedly invented, dead-pan indie pop," says Pitchfork, throughout the band's 30 year career, not least in 1999's 69 Love Songs and its 2017 Nonesuch album, 50 Song Memoir. The site cites Sam Sodomsky's review of the latter release, which notes Stephin Merritt's "growing mastery as a songwriter. It suggests that our deepest wisdom can be located in our most personal thoughts."

"As he evolved from Omaha, Nebraska’s teenage emo wunderkind into one of America’s most respected songwriters, gracefully fulfilling the 'New Dylan' role that early critics placed on him," says Pitchfork, "Conor Oberst remained in constant motion ... His long career has set a benchmark for how to evolve while maintaining your integrity as an indie artist in the 21st century."

Noting Fleet Foxes' evolution over the years to creating albums that were "more adventurous, confrontational, and graceful," Pitchfork cites a profile by Amanda Petrusich around the release of the band's 2017 Nonesuch album, Crack-Up: "[Robin] Pecknold is gentle and intelligent, a hungry listener; talking with him, you get the sense that an antenna is always up and open, collecting new and better information about the world."

Björk, whose 2011 studio album Biophilia and 2009 live album Voltaic: Songs from the Volta Tour were released on Nonesuch in the US, "has united electronic innovation, audio-visual experiments, radical new performance modes, scientific investigation, and naked emotional expression in one dazzling catalog," says Pitchfork, "becoming one of the most uncompromising pop stars of our era in the process."

You can read more on all of the above and see the complete list of the 'The 200 Most Important Artists of Pitchfork’s First 25 Years' at pitchfork.com.

featuredimage: 
Pitchfork: 'The 200 Most Important Artists of Pitchfork’s First 25 Years,' October 2022

Related Posts

  • Friday, October 22, 2021
    Friday, October 22, 2021

    The Magnetic Fields’ City Winery residency, originally scheduled for spring 2020 to celebrate their new album Quickies, begins in their hometown of Boston this weekend. The band will perform songs spanning their 30+ year career, including Quickies and 69 Love Songs, at intimate City Winery venues in seven cities—Boston, New York, Philadelphia, DC, Atlanta, Nashville, and Chicago.

    Journal Topics: Artist NewsOn Tour
  • Thursday, October 21, 2021
    Thursday, October 21, 2021

    Punch Brothers’ interpretation of the Jimmie Rodgers' “Any Old Time,” from their forthcoming album Hell on Church Street, is out now. Hell on Church Street, due January 14, is a reimagining of, and homage to, the late bluegrass great Tony Rice’s landmark solo album Church Street Blues. The record features a collection of songs by Bob Dylan, Gordon Lightfoot, Bill Monroe, and others. Preorders from the Nonesuch and Punch Brothers stores include a limited-edition print signed by the band while supplies last. Punch Brothers tour North America in support of the album beginning in January.

    Journal Topics: Artist News
[{"parent":{"title":"Get on the list !","body":" Get exclusive information about NONESUCH tour dates, video premieres and special announcements ","field_newsletter_id":"14075483","field_label_list_id":"6389157","field_display_rates":"-1","field_preview_mode":"false","field_lbox_height":"","field_lbox_width":"","field_toaster_timeout":"16000","field_toaster_position":"From Bottom","field_turnkey_height":"800"}}]

Performs On