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  • Friday, January 16, 2009
    Financial Times Gives Four Stars to Joshua Redman's "Compass"

    Joshua Redman's latest Nonesuch release, Compass, out this past Tuesday, earns four stars from the Financial Times. Jazz critic Mike Hobart lauds Redman's "rigorous intellect and gritty edge ... while his saxophone entices with its mix of classical purity and multi-noted wails."

    Hobart goes on to credit the album's pioneering use of a double-trio format, in which both sets of drummers and bassists featured on other tracks combine to add "extra excitement" to the tunes. "Here drummers Brian Blade and Gregory Hutchinson and bassists Larry Grenadier and Reuben Rogers swap roles and breaks so fluently," says Hobart, "it's hard to believe the session was a relatively unplanned 'embrace of the unfamiliar.'"

    Read the review at ft.com.

    The Evening Standard gives the album four stars as well, stating that Redman's "writing and playing is brilliantly lucid."

    ---

    Redman celebrates the record's release in conversation with critic Gary Giddins at the City University of New York's Center for the Humanities tonight. The discussion, which will focus on Redman's place in the history of jazz, will be held at Elebash Recital Hall in Manhattan and is free and open to the public. For more information, visit centerforthehumanities.org.

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Financial Times Gives Four Stars to Joshua Redman's "Compass"

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on January 16, 2009 - 11:14am
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Friday, January 16, 2009 - 15:30
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Joshua Redman's latest Nonesuch release, Compass, out this past Tuesday, earns four stars from the Financial Times, which lauds Redman's "rigorous intellect and gritty edge ... while his saxophone entices with its mix of classical purity and multi-noted wails." The review cites the "extra excitement" that comes from the album's pioneering use of a double-trio format. The Evening Standard gives the album four stars as well, stating that Redman's "writing and playing is brilliantly lucid."

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Joshua Redman's latest Nonesuch release, Compass, out this past Tuesday, earns four stars from the Financial Times. Jazz critic Mike Hobart lauds Redman's "rigorous intellect and gritty edge ... while his saxophone entices with its mix of classical purity and multi-noted wails."

Hobart goes on to credit the album's pioneering use of a double-trio format, in which both sets of drummers and bassists featured on other tracks combine to add "extra excitement" to the tunes. "Here drummers Brian Blade and Gregory Hutchinson and bassists Larry Grenadier and Reuben Rogers swap roles and breaks so fluently," says Hobart, "it's hard to believe the session was a relatively unplanned 'embrace of the unfamiliar.'"

Read the review at ft.com.

The Evening Standard gives the album four stars as well, stating that Redman's "writing and playing is brilliantly lucid."

---

Redman celebrates the record's release in conversation with critic Gary Giddins at the City University of New York's Center for the Humanities tonight. The discussion, which will focus on Redman's place in the history of jazz, will be held at Elebash Recital Hall in Manhattan and is free and open to the public. For more information, visit centerforthehumanities.org.

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Joshua Redman "Compass" [cover]

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