Skip directly to content
Browse by:
  • Tuesday, February 9, 2021
    Listen: Tristan Perich's 'Drift Multiply' Featured on WNYC's 'New Sounds'
    New Sounds

    Tristan Perich, whose new album, Drift Multiply, for 50 violins and 50-channel 1-bit electronics, was released on New Amsterdam and Nonesuch Records last November, is featured on the latest episode of WNYC's New Sounds. "It is an album-length excursion, goes into lots of different territories," says host John Schaefer. "Some moments sound to me like Terry RIley's early keyboard improvisations. Other parts have the rhythmic patterning of Steve Reich's music. There are other moments where the notes seem to give way more to noise. And even one part where those noises kind of sound a little like the famous rhythmic kecak, or monkey chant, from the island of Bali." You can hear the episode, including the first and second sections of Drift Multiply, below, and hear the whole piece here.

    The composer's largest work to date, Drift Multiply is conducted by Douglas Perkins. Scored as one hundred individual lines of music, the piece blends violins and speakers into a cascading tapestry of tone, harmony, and noise. The violins perform from sheet music, while the speakers are each connected to custom-built circuit boards programmed to output 1-bit audio, the most basic digital waveforms made of just ones and zeroes.

    Journal Articles:Artist NewsRadio

Enjoy This Post?

Share This Post

Listen: Tristan Perich's 'Drift Multiply' Featured on WNYC's 'New Sounds'

Browse by:
nonesuch's picture
on February 9, 2021 - 9:00am
Article Type: 
Publish date: 
Tuesday, February 9, 2021 - 09:00
Excerpt: 

Tristan Perich's Drift Multiply, for 50 violins and 50-channel 1-bit electronics, is featured on WNYC's New Sounds. "It is an album-length excursion, goes into lots of different territories," says host John Schaefer. "Some moments sound to me like Terry RIley's early keyboard improvisations. Other parts have the rhythmic patterning of Steve Reich's music. There are other moments where the notes seem to give way more to noise. And even one part where those noises kind of sound a little like the famous rhythmic kecak, or monkey chant, from the island of Bali." You can hear the episode here.

Copy: 

Tristan Perich, whose new album, Drift Multiply, for 50 violins and 50-channel 1-bit electronics, was released on New Amsterdam and Nonesuch Records last November, is featured on the latest episode of WNYC's New Sounds. "It is an album-length excursion, goes into lots of different territories," says host John Schaefer. "Some moments sound to me like Terry RIley's early keyboard improvisations. Other parts have the rhythmic patterning of Steve Reich's music. There are other moments where the notes seem to give way more to noise. And even one part where those noises kind of sound a little like the famous rhythmic kecak, or monkey chant, from the island of Bali." You can hear the episode, including the first and second sections of Drift Multiply, below, and hear the whole piece here.

The composer's largest work to date, Drift Multiply is conducted by Douglas Perkins. Scored as one hundred individual lines of music, the piece blends violins and speakers into a cascading tapestry of tone, harmony, and noise. The violins perform from sheet music, while the speakers are each connected to custom-built circuit boards programmed to output 1-bit audio, the most basic digital waveforms made of just ones and zeroes.

featuredimage: 
Tristan Perich: WNYC's 'New Sounds,' February 2021

Related Posts

  • Wednesday, February 24, 2021
    Wednesday, February 24, 2021

    Darius Marder, the director of the film Sound of Metal, is on The Backstory podcast to discuss the film and its sound design with host Jason Bentley and fellow guest Ludwig Göransson, composer of the scores to Black Panther, Tenet, and The Mandalorian. You can hear their conversation here. "Early accolades for sound design, and rightly so," Bentley says of Sound of Metal. "The use of sound in this film is a powerful tool to support the storytelling. Darius wrote the screenplay with his brother Abraham, who also contributed music, and whose song 'Green' for the film has been shortlisted for an Oscar nomination."

    Journal Topics: Artist News
  • Monday, February 22, 2021
    Monday, February 22, 2021

    Composer, pianist, and singer Gabriel Kahane is a recipient of the American Academy of Arts and Letters' Charles Ives Fellowship. He is one of eighteen recipients of the Academy's 2021 music awards. Harmony Ives, the widow of Charles Ives, bequeathed to the Academy the royalties of Charles Ives’s music, which has enabled the Academy to give awards in composition since 1970, including two Charles Ives Fellowships of $15,000 each. The awards will be presented virtually at the Academy's Ceremonial on May 19.

    Journal Topics: Artist News
[{"parent":{"title":"Get on the list !","body":" Get exclusive information about NONESUCH tour dates, video premieres and special announcements ","field_newsletter_id":"14075483","field_label_list_id":"6389157","field_display_rates":"-1","field_preview_mode":"false","field_lbox_height":"","field_lbox_width":"","field_toaster_timeout":"16000","field_toaster_position":"From Bottom","field_turnkey_height":"800"}}]

Performs On