Pianist Jeremy Denk's New Album, "c.1300–c.2000," Due February 8 on Nonesuch Records

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Pianist Jeremy Denk's new album, c. 1300–c. 2000, is due February 8, 2019. The album spans seven centuries of music by twenty-four different composers, from Guillaume de Machaut to György Ligeti. "A piano recital covering 700 years of music: by most accepted definitions, that ought to be not just an oxymoron but an impossibility," says the Telegraph. "But the usual barriers fall whenever Jeremy Denk is at the keyboard ... Quite exhilarating." Watch a video of Binchois's Triste Plaisir here and pre-order the album to download the piece now.

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Nonesuch Records releases pianist Jeremy Denk's c.1300–c.2000 on February 1 February 8, 2019. The two-disc album captures a program of works spanning seven centuries that Denk created and performed at venues including Lincoln Center, Wigmore Hall, and Piano aux Jacobins. "The history of so-called classical music felt closer to me now than it did when I first learned about it in college, not just more relevant, but more alive. Wouldn't it be amazing, I wondered, to experience this sweep and arc in one sitting?" For that program, Denk performed twenty-four pieces by composers ranging from Machaut to Ligeti—with Binchois, Gesualdo, Stockhausen, Philip Glass, and many others in the middle.

The resulting album, c.1300–c.2000, is available to pre-order now from iTunes and the Nonesuch Store, where it includes an instant download of Binchois's Triste Plaisir; it will also stream at Spotify and Apple Music.

Denk says in the liner note, "You might call this album a version of time-lapse photography, which brings us from the 1300s to the present day in a series of sonic snapshots. I was aiming for a healthy mixture of light and dark, of optimism and pessimism." He continues, "To find a foothold, I started in the medieval era with two threads: the secular, and the religious. Worldly love, and love of God. At the same time, I felt it was essential to deal with a more purely musical love: the art of counterpoint, a foundation of the long story to come. If you don't care about counterpoint, you should. It is music's superpower, something it can do that no other art form quite can."

Jeremy Denk is one of America's foremost pianists. Winner of a MacArthur "Genius" Fellowship, and the Avery Fisher Prize, Denk was recently elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2018–19, Denk embarks on a three-week recital tour of the US, and culminating in his return to Carnegie Hall. His orchestral highlights include playing-directing Mozart with the Toronto Symphony, and on tour throughout the US with Academy St. Martin in the Fields.

This season, Denk also reunites with his longtime collaborators Joshua Bell and Steven Isserlis, on an eleven-city tour of the US and performs and curates a series of Mozart violin sonatas ("Denk & Friends") at Carnegie Hall. Further collaborations include performing the Ives violin sonatas at Tanglewood with Stefan Jackiw.

Denk is known for his original and insightful writing on music, which Alex Ross praises for its "arresting sensitivity and wit." The pianist's writing has appeared in the New Yorker, New Republic, Guardian, and on the front page of the New York Times Book Review. One of his New Yorker contributions, "Every Good Boy Does Fine," forms the basis of a book for future publication by Random House in the US, and Macmillan in the UK.

Denk's previous Nonesuch releases include an album of works by Beethoven and Ligeti and a recording of Bach's Goldberg Variations with accompanying video "liner notes."

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Jeremy Denk: "c.1300–c.2000" [cover]
  • Thursday, November 1, 2018
    Pianist Jeremy Denk's New Album, "c.1300–c.2000," Due February 8 on Nonesuch Records

    Nonesuch Records releases pianist Jeremy Denk's c.1300–c.2000 on February 1 February 8, 2019. The two-disc album captures a program of works spanning seven centuries that Denk created and performed at venues including Lincoln Center, Wigmore Hall, and Piano aux Jacobins. "The history of so-called classical music felt closer to me now than it did when I first learned about it in college, not just more relevant, but more alive. Wouldn't it be amazing, I wondered, to experience this sweep and arc in one sitting?" For that program, Denk performed twenty-four pieces by composers ranging from Machaut to Ligeti—with Binchois, Gesualdo, Stockhausen, Philip Glass, and many others in the middle.

    The resulting album, c.1300–c.2000, is available to pre-order now from iTunes and the Nonesuch Store, where it includes an instant download of Binchois's Triste Plaisir; it will also stream at Spotify and Apple Music.

    Denk says in the liner note, "You might call this album a version of time-lapse photography, which brings us from the 1300s to the present day in a series of sonic snapshots. I was aiming for a healthy mixture of light and dark, of optimism and pessimism." He continues, "To find a foothold, I started in the medieval era with two threads: the secular, and the religious. Worldly love, and love of God. At the same time, I felt it was essential to deal with a more purely musical love: the art of counterpoint, a foundation of the long story to come. If you don't care about counterpoint, you should. It is music's superpower, something it can do that no other art form quite can."

    Jeremy Denk is one of America's foremost pianists. Winner of a MacArthur "Genius" Fellowship, and the Avery Fisher Prize, Denk was recently elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2018–19, Denk embarks on a three-week recital tour of the US, and culminating in his return to Carnegie Hall. His orchestral highlights include playing-directing Mozart with the Toronto Symphony, and on tour throughout the US with Academy St. Martin in the Fields.

    This season, Denk also reunites with his longtime collaborators Joshua Bell and Steven Isserlis, on an eleven-city tour of the US and performs and curates a series of Mozart violin sonatas ("Denk & Friends") at Carnegie Hall. Further collaborations include performing the Ives violin sonatas at Tanglewood with Stefan Jackiw.

    Denk is known for his original and insightful writing on music, which Alex Ross praises for its "arresting sensitivity and wit." The pianist's writing has appeared in the New Yorker, New Republic, Guardian, and on the front page of the New York Times Book Review. One of his New Yorker contributions, "Every Good Boy Does Fine," forms the basis of a book for future publication by Random House in the US, and Macmillan in the UK.

    Denk's previous Nonesuch releases include an album of works by Beethoven and Ligeti and a recording of Bach's Goldberg Variations with accompanying video "liner notes."

    Journal Articles:Album ReleaseArtist News

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